Facilitators and Contributing Organizations

Essayists and Contributors

Director of HMPI and Editor of Blueprints

Katharine Coles Katharine Coles is the inaugural director of the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute at the Poetry Foundation. Her most recent collection of poems, Fault, came out in 2008; she has also published novels and essays and has collaborated with various visual artists on projects resulting in both temporary and permanent installations. She is a professor at the University of Utah, where she founded and co-directs the Utah Symposium in Science and Literature. In 2006, she was named to a five-year term as poet laureate of Utah.

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Essayist

Elizabeth Alexander Elizabeth Alexander is a poet, essayist, playwright, teacher, and current chair of the African American Studies Department at Yale University. She has served on the faculty and as a board member and is now honorary director of Cave Canem, an organization dedicated to the development and endurance of African American poetic voices. Her poetry collection American Sublime was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and her sixth book of poems is Crave Radiance: New and Selected Poems, 1990–2010. Alexander was selected to compose and read a poem at the presidential inauguration of Barack Obama in 2009.

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Essayist

Sherwin Bitsui Sherwin Bitsui is the author of two poetry books, Shapeshift, and Flood Song. His honors include a Whiting Writers Award, a 2010 PEN Open Book Award and an American Book Award. He is originally from Baaʼoogeedí (White Cone, Arizona) on the Navajo Nation. Currently, he lives in Tucson. He is Diné of the Todichʼíiʼnii (Bitter Water Clan), born for the Tłʼízíłání (Many Goats Clan).

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Essayist

Alison Hawthorne Deming Alison Hawthorne Deming is a poet, essayist, and professor in creative writing at the University of Arizona. From 1990 until 2000, she served as director of the University of Arizona Poetry Center, an internationally renowned poetry library, where she continues to serve as a member of the Development Board. In addition to her works of nonfiction and essays, she is the author of four collections of poetry, including Science and Other Poems and, most recently, Rope.

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Essayist

Dana Gioia Dana Gioia is a poet, critic, and current director of the Aspen Institute’s Harman-Eisner Program in the Arts. Under his former leadership as chairman, the National Endowment for the Arts reached millions of Americans through grants and arts programs such as Poetry Out Loud, a poetry recitation contest offered in partnership with the Poetry Foundation that has, in the past five years, involved over three-quarters of a million high school students. His most recent book of poems, Interrogations at Noon, won the American Book Award. His critical collection, Can Poetry Matter?, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award.

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Essayist

Robert Hass Robert Hass served as poet laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997 and was awarded the 2007 National Book Award and the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Time and Materials: Poems 1997–2005. In addition to being a professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley, he is the cofounder of River of Words, an organization that champions environmental and arts education, where he continues to serve as a judge, advisor, and co-chairman of the board. His most recent book is The Apple Trees at Olema: New and Selected Poems.

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Essayist

Bas Kwakman Bas Kwakman is the managing director of Poetry International Rotterdam (the Netherlands), a literary organization working to promote international exchange among poets, poetry translators, poetry connoisseurs, and poetry lovers. Poetry International’s projects include its online poetry magazine, www.poetryinternational.org, which has over twenty international partners, and the annual Rotterdam Poetry International Festival. Prior to joining Poetry International, Kwakman was a founder and an editor of Tortuca, a magazine for art and literature, and worked as an independent visual artist and a poet.

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Essayist

Thomas Lux Thomas Lux is a poet who currently holds the Bourne Chair in Poetry at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he also runs the Poetry at Tech program, one of the premier showcases of poetry in the Southeast, and serves as director of the McEver Visiting Writers program. The author of eleven poetry collections, most recently God Particles, and a recipient of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, he is also on the MFA faculties of Sarah Lawrence College and Warren Wilson College.

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Essayist

Christopher Merrill Christopher Merrill has published four collections of poetry, including Watch Fire, for which he received the Peter I. B. Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets; translations of Aleš Debeljak’s Anxious Moments and The City and the Child; several edited volumes; and four books of nonfiction. His work has been translated into twenty-five languages, his journalism appears widely, and for ten years he was the book critic for the daily radio news program The World. He has held the William H. Jenks Chair in Contemporary Letters at the College of the Holy Cross and now directs the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa.

Courtesy of Bello Magazine
Essayist

Luis Rodriguez Luis Rodriguez is a poet, journalist, fiction writer, children’s book author, critic, and author of the memoir Always Running: La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A. He has founded or cofounded numerous community organizations, including Chicago’s Guild Complex, Youth Struggling for Survival, Tia Chucha Press, and Tia Chucha’s Centro Cultural & Bookstore, which provides a bookstore, performance space, and workshop center for its inner city neighborhood and sponsors Celebrating Words: Written, Performed & Sung, a literacy and performing arts festival.

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Essayist

Anna Deavere Smith Anna Deavere Smith is an actress, playwright, author, and professor at New York University. Her work exploring American character and national identity has earned her many awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship, two Obie Awards, and two Tony nominations. Her play Fires in the Mirror was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She is founding director of Anna Deavere Smith Works, Inc., a center that convenes artists whose work addresses the world’s most pressing problems.

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Essayist

Patricia Smith Patricia Smith is an author, performer, playwright, teacher, and four-time National Poetry Slam champion, the most successful competitor in slam history. Her fifth book of poetry, Blood Dazzler, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award. In addition to being published in numerous journals and anthologies, her work can be found in stage productions, on CD, in an award-winning short film, and in HBO’s Def Poetry Jam. She is a professor of creative writing at the City University of New York/College of Staten Island and a faculty member at both Cave Canem and the Stonecoast MFA Program at the University of Southern Maine.

Toolkit Contributor

Susan Boskoff Susan Boskoff is executive director of the Nevada Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs. In partnership with arts organizations, schools, and communities, the Arts Council actively works to bring artists, a diversity of art forms, and audiences together in Nevada’s metropolitan centers and isolated rural towns. Its public programs include the Nevada Circuit Riders, Nevada Folklife Archives, and the Nevada Touring Initiative, which includes the Tumblewords Literary Program. The Council also partners with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation on the annual Poetry Out Loud recitation competition.

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Toolkit Contributor

Tree Swenson Tree Swenson is the executive director of the Academy of American Poets, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting American poets and fostering appreciation of contemporary poetry through programs such as Poets.org, National Poetry Month, the Poetry Audio Archive, and the literary journal American Poet, as well as through its numerous awards and prizes for poets. Prior to joining the Academy, Swenson served as director of programs for the Massachusetts Cultural Council and was the cofounder, publisher, and executive director of Copper Canyon Press.

Toolkit Contributor

Orlando White Orlando White is from Tólikan, Arizona. He is Diné of the Naaneesht’ézhi Tábaahí and born for the Naakai Diné’e. He holds a BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts and an MFA from Brown University. He is the author of Bone Light (Red Hen Press, 2009) and teaches at Diné College and lives in Tsaile, Arizona.

Project Manager / Toolkit Contributor

Elizabeth Allen Elizabeth Allen is the project manager for the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute and has been with the Poetry Foundation since 2004. She holds an MA in cultural and educational leadership and policy studies from Loyola University. Before joining the Poetry Foundation, she served as executive assistant to Stanley Fish at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago and coordinated the Field Museum of Natural History’s lecture series.

Poetry and New Media Essayists and Contributors

Director

Katharine Coles Katharine Coles is the inaugural director of the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute at the Poetry Foundation. Her most recent collection of poems, Fault, came out in 2008; she has also published novels and essays and has collaborated with various visual artists on projects resulting in both temporary and permanent installations. She is a professor at the University of Utah, where she founded and co-directs the Utah Symposium in Science and Literature. In 2006, she was named to a five-year term as poet laureate of Utah.

Panel Member

Michael Collier Poet and editor Michael Collier is a professor of English at the University of Maryland and poetry editor at Houghton Mifflin. His latest collection of poems, The Ledge, was a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. He has received Guggenheim, NEA, and Thomas Watson fellowships, and since 1994 he has served as the director of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.

Panel Member

Wyn CooperWyn Cooper is a poet and lyricist whose fourth book of poems is Chaos is the New Calm. His poem “Fun” was the basis for Sheryl Crow’s Grammy-winning song “All I Wanna Do.” He has written songs with David Broza, David Baerwald, Jody Redhage, and Madison Smartt Bell. Songs by Bell and Cooper appear on their two CDs (most recently, Postcards Out of the Blue) and can be heard on six television shows. He lives in Vermont.

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Panel Member

Rita Dove A poet, playwright, and former poet laureate of the United States, Rita Dove is the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. She has received numerous literary and academic honors, including the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and the 1996 National Humanities Medal. Rita has also written texts for major musical works and collaborated with John Williams on Steven Spielberg’s The Unfinished Journey.

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Panel Member

Cornelius Eady Poet and playwright Cornelius Eady is the director of the Creative Writing Program at the University of Notre Dame and co-founder of Cave Canem. He has collaborated with jazz composer Diedre Murray, and he wrote the libretto for the opera You Don’t Miss Your Water as well as Running Man, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Drama. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the NEA.

Panel Member

David Fenza Poet, professor, and arts administrator David Fenza is the executive director of the Association of Writers & Writing Programs, an organization dedicated to serving writers, teachers, and writing programs. AWP also publishes The Writer’s Chronicle.

Panel Member

Kate Gale Editor, writer, and arts manager Kate Gale is managing editor of Red Hen Press. A teacher at Antioch University Los Angeles, she speaks at universities and writing conferences on publishing, editing, and publicity. She was the 2005–06 president of PEN USA; serves on the boards of Claremont Graduate University School of Arts and Humanities, A Room of Her Own Foundation, and Poetry Society of America; and is president of the American Composers Forum Los Angeles.

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Panel Member

Kimiko Hahn Poet Kimiko Hahn is Distinguished Professor of English at Queens College, City University of New York. Her seven collections of poetry include The Unbearable Heart, which won the American Book Award. Kimiko was the screenwriter for the film collaboration Everywhere at Once, based on Peter Lindbergh’s still photos and narrated by Jeanne Moreau, which premiered at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival and was presented at the 2008 Tribeca Film Festival.

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Lewis Hyde Poet, translator, essayist, and critic Lewis Hyde is currently the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College. His many honors include fellowships from the NEA, the NEH, the Lannan Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation, as well as residencies at the Getty Museum and San Francisco’s Exploratorium. His internationally acclaimed book The Gift tries to reconcile creative work with a market economy.

Panel Member

Fiona McCrae Fiona McCrae is publisher and executive director of Graywolf Press, one of the nation’s leading nonprofit literary presses and the publisher of numerous award-winning collections of poems. She was previously a director and editor at Faber and Faber and has served on the board of the Council of Independent Magazines and Presses.

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Panel Member

Robert Pinsky Robert Pinsky is the poetry editor of the online magazine Slate and a professor at Boston University. A three-time poet laureate of the United States, Robert founded the Favorite Poem Project; the project’s most recent anthology is An Invitation to Poetry, which includes a DVD featuring Americans reading and talking about beloved poems. He is the author of the award-winning books The Figured Wheel and The Inferno of Dante and, most recently, Gulf Music.

Panel Member

Claudia Rankine The Henry G. Lee Professor of English at Pomona College, Claudia Rankine is the author of four collections of poetry and co-editor of American Women Poets in the Twenty-First Century: Where Lyric Meets Language and American Poets in the Twenty-First Century: The New Poetics. Her play Detour opened in 2009 at the Foundry Theater in New York. She has received fellowships from the Academy of American Poetry, the NEA, and the Lannan Foundation.

Panel Member

Alberto Ríos Poet Alberto Ríos is the Regents’ Professor of English at Arizona State University. Alberto is the author of ten books and chapbooks of poetry, three collections of short stories, and a memoir. His work has been included in over 200 national and international anthologies and has been translated and adapted to dance and both classical and popular music. His many awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the NEA.

Panel Member

Don Selby Don Selby is co-editor of Poetry Daily (poems.com), which he founded following a career in law publishing. Poetry Daily’s mission is to help make contemporary poetry part of everyday life by making it easier for people to discover new poetry and for poets and publishers to bring news of their work to more people. He has served on grant and award panels for the NEA and the Virginia Commission for the Arts and is co-editor of two Poetry Daily anthologies.

Panel Member

Rick Stevens Rick Stevens is a professor of computer science at the University of Chicago, associate laboratory director for computing and life sciences at Argonne National Laboratory, and a senior fellow of the Argonne/University of Chicago Computation Institute, a multidisciplinary organization aimed at connecting computing to all areas of inquiry at the university and the laboratory. Rick also heads the Argonne/Chicago Futures Lab, a research group he founded to investigate problems in large-scale scientific visualization and advanced collaboration environments.

Panel Member

Jennifer Urban Jennifer Urban teaches and studies issues related to intellectual property and technology law and policy at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, where she co-directs the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic. Previously she taught at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, where she founded and directed its Intellectual Property and Technology Law Clinic. At both institutions, she and her students work to support artists and emerging art forms and to advance the public’s interest in areas of intellectual property and technology policy.

Monica Youn Monica Youn is counsel in the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, where she focuses on constitutional litigation. Previously she was in private practice as a media and intellectual property lawyer. Her first book of poems, Barter, was published in 2003 by Graywolf Press; a new work, Ignatz, is forthcoming from Four Way Books in 2010. She has received poetry fellowships from the Library of Congress, the Rockefeller Foundation, and Stanford University, and has been an adjunct professor of creative writing at Pratt Institute and Columbia University.

Consultant

Jaune EvansJaune Evans is director of Donor Services at The Tides Foundation of San Francisco and New York. She works with fine arts programs, human rights and cultural organizations, indigenous and environmental groups, and innovative community projects. Jaune served as the executive director of programs at the Lannan Foundation for ten years, and before that as the executive director of the New Mexico Community Foundation and as the deputy director of public health for the state of New Mexico.

Project Manager

Elizabeth Allen Elizabeth Allen is the project manager for the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute and has been with the Poetry Foundation since 2004. She holds an MA in cultural and educational leadership and policy studies from Loyola University. Before joining the Poetry Foundation, she served as executive assistant to Stanley Fish at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago and coordinated the Field Museum of Natural History’s lecture series.

Special Project: Best Practices for Fair Use in Poetry Facilitators and Contributing Organizations

Facilitator

Katharine Coles Katharine Coles is the inaugural director of the Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute at the Poetry Foundation. Her most recent collection of poems, Fault, came out in 2008; she has also published novels and essays and has collaborated with various visual artists on projects resulting in both temporary and permanent installations. She is a professor at the University of Utah, where she founded and co-directs the Utah Symposium in Science and Literature. In 2006, she was named to a five-year term as poet laureate of Utah.

The Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, led by Professor Peter Jaszi, promotes social justice in law governing information dissemination and intellectual property through research, scholarship, public events, advocacy, and provision of legal and consulting services. The program is a project of the Washington College of Law at American University in Washington, DC, led by Dean Claudio Grossman.

The Center for Social Media, led by Professor Patricia Aufderheide, showcases and analyzes media for social justice, civil society, and democracy, and the public environment that nurtures them. The center is a project of the School of Communication, led by Dean Larry Kirkman, at American University in Washington, DC

The Harriet Monroe Poetry Institute is an independent forum created by the Poetry Foundation to provide a space in which fresh thinking about poetry, in both its intellectual and its practical needs, can flourish free of any allegiance other than to the best ideas. The institute convenes leading poets, scholars, publishers, educators, and other thinkers from inside and outside the poetry world to address issues of importance to the art form of poetry and to identify and champion solutions for the benefit of the art. Funded by the Poetry Foundation.

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Facilitator

Patricia Aufderheide Patricia Aufderheide is University Professor in the School of Communication at American University and the director of the Center for Social Media there. With Peter Jaszi, she has co-facilitated several codes of best practices in fair use. Her publications include Reclaiming Fair Use: How to Get Balance Back in Copyright (University of Chicago Press, 2011, co-authored with Peter Jaszi) and Documentary Film: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2007). She is the recipient of several career-achievement awards for her documentary and fair use scholarship.

Facilitator

Peter Jaszi Peter Jaszi is faculty director of the Glushko-Samuelson Intellectual Property Law Clinic and professor of law at the Washington College of Law of American University. He is the co-author or co-editor of several books, including The Construction of Authorship: Textual Appropriation in Law and Literature (with M. Woodmansee, Duke University Press, 1994) and two volumes forthcoming in 2011 from the University of Chicago Press: Fair is Fair (with P. Aufderheide) and The Making and Unmaking of Intellectual Property (with M. Biagioli and M. Woodmansee). He holds expertise in copyright law and theory, and works as an advocate for public access to information. Professor Jaszi recently has been honored by the American Library Association and the Intellectual Property Section of the District of Columbia Bar.

Facilitator

Jennifer Urban Jennifer Urban teaches and studies issues related to intellectual property and technology law and policy at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, where she co-directs the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic. Previously she taught at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, where she founded and directed its Intellectual Property and Technology Law Clinic. At both institutions, she and her students work to support artists and emerging art forms and to advance the public’s interest in areas of intellectual property and technology policy.

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Cultural and literary advisor

Lewis Hyde Lewis Hyde is a poet, translator, essayist, and critic. He is the Richard L. Thomas Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College and a Faculty Associate at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. His many honors include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Lannan Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, as well as residencies at the Getty Museum and San Francisco’s Exploratorium. His internationally acclaimed book The Gift tries to reconcile creative work with a market economy. Hyde’s most recent book, Common as Air, is a spirited defense of our “cultural commons,” that vast store of ideas, inventions, and works of art that we have inherited from the past and continue to enrich in the present.

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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