For Immediate Release

Poetry, Granta, and STOP SMILING present: A Celebration of Literary Chicago

In conjunction with the launch of Granta’s Chicago-themed fall issue

September 8, 2009

CHICAGO – The Poetry Foundation announces that Chicago literary institutions Poetry and STOP SMILING will join with UK-based journal Granta to celebrate the launch of Granta's special Chicago-themed fall issue. The event will feature readings by contributors to both Poetry and Granta and will debut previously unpublished poems by native Chicagoan James Schuyler, with Granta editor John Freeman offering an introduction. David Trinidad, a friend of Schuyler's, will speak briefly about the poet's life and work and read a selection of his poems forthcoming in Poetry and Granta. Chicago poets Reginald Gibbons, Anne Winters, and Diego Báez will also read. A reception follows. 

What: A Celebration of Literary Chicago: featuring Reginald Gibbons, Anne Winters, and Diego Báez, with David Trinidad reading previously unpublished work by James Schuyler. A reception follows the reading. 

When: Tuesday, September 15, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

Where: Stop Smiling Storefront, 1371 North Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago

Admission is free and open to the public.

Diego Báez received a bachelor's degree in English from Illinois Wesleyan University and is currently pursuing his MFA at Rutgers University–Newark. His poetry and criticism appear in Poemeleon, Growler, The Ampersand Review, and The Little White Poetry Journal. 

Reginald Gibbons's most recent book of poems is Creatures of a Day (2008), a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award. His new translations of Sophocles, Selected Poems: Odes and Fragments (2008), won the Soeurette Diehl Fraser translation award from the Texas Institute of Letters. His new book, Slow Trains Overhead: Chicago Poems and Stories, will be published in 2010. Gibbons teaches at Northwestern University. 

James Schuyler was a preeminent figure in the celebrated New York School of poets. After World War II he made his way to Italy, where he served for a time as W.H. Auden's secretary. His books include three novels, A Nest of Ninnies (written with John Ashbery), Alfred and Guinevere, and What's For Dinner, as well as numerous volumes of poetry. 

David Trinidad received his MFA from Brooklyn College and has taught at Rutgers University, the New School, and Princeton University. His collection Plasticville (2000) was a finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize of the Academy of American Poets. Trinidad teaches at Columbia College Chicago, where he co-founded the literary journal Court Green. 

Anne Winters is on the faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her books include The Displaced of Capital; The Key to the City, which was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and Salamander: Selected Poetry of Robert Marteau, winner of Poetry's Jacob Glatstein Translation Award. Her published poems and essays appear in the New Republic, the New Yorker, Paris Review, Poetry, and Yale Review, as well as journals in France, Canada, and Italy.

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About Poetry Magazine

Founded in Chicago by Harriet Monroe in 1912, Poetry is the oldest monthly devoted to verse in the English-speaking world. Monroe's “Open Door” policy, set forth in Volume I of the magazine, remains the most succinct statement of Poetry's mission: to print the best poetry written today, in whatever style, genre, or approach. The magazine established its reputation early by publishing the first important poems of T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, H.D., William Carlos Williams, Carl Sandburg, and other now-classic authors. In succeeding decades it has presented—often for the first time—works by virtually every major contemporary poet. 

About the Poetry Foundation
The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine and one of the largest literary organizations in the world, exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. The Poetry Foundation seeks to be a leader in shaping a receptive climate for poetry by developing new audiences, creating new avenues for delivery, and encouraging new kinds of poetry through innovative literary prizes and programs. For more information, please visit www.poetryfoundation.org.

 

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