For Immediate Release

Poetry Magazine Podcast Announced as Finalist for National Magazine Award

American Society of Magazine Editors’ Digital ‘Ellie’ recognizes innovations in magazine media

February 25, 2011

CHICAGO — The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine, is pleased to announce that its Poetry magazine podcast is a finalist for the National Magazine Awards for Digital Media in the “Podcasting” category. Poetry shares distinguished company with fellow category finalists Harvard Business Review, The New Yorker, Slate, and Tablet. This is the second ASME nomination for the Poetry Foundation; in 2010, the Chicago Poetry Tour was a finalist in the category of “Multimedia Feature or Package.”

Now in their second year, the National Magazine Awards for Digital Media complement the American Society of Magazine Editors’ awards for print journalism, which have been presented each year since 1966. The awards, sponsored by ASME in association with the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, are regarded as the “most prestigious in the magazine industry,” according to the New York Times.

“The most common complaint about poetry is that readers find it too difficult,” said Christian Wiman, editor of Poetry magazine. “The podcast allows us an opportunity to make our content more accessible by going beyond the words on the page.” Added senior editor Don Share, “William Carlos Williams once said, ‘If it ain’t a pleasure, it ain’t a poem.’ Our podcasts are fun, and in them we aim to share the pleasures of poetry.”

The monthly podcast features lively discussion between Wiman and Share, who go inside the magazine, talk to poets and critics, debate content, and share their poem selections with listeners. Drawing on their own experience as poets and poetry readers, the editors offer insights into the genre that are enlightening to both novice and seasoned poetry readers. Listeners can test their impressions of a poem against the opinion and interpretation of Poetry’s editors, as well as learn more about the words and how they came to be on the page.

Recent episodes feature excerpts from a libretto by Robert Pinsky, a conversation with Ange Mlinko about motherhood and poetry, an interview with Carolyn Forché, poems by Vijay Seshadri, and calls from contributors in Israel, India, Greece, and England.

The oldest monthly magazine in the English-speaking world devoted to verse, Poetry is committed to showcasing the best poetry, and the best prose about poetry, written today. We don’t all have a literary companion with whom we can discuss verse in person, but the Poetry magazine podcast ensures that each month listeners can spend some time with the editors of one of the most venerable literary magazines in America.

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About Poetry Magazine
Founded in Chicago by Harriet Monroe in 1912, Poetry is the oldest monthly devoted to verse in the English-speaking world. Monroe’s “Open Door” policy, set forth in Volume I of the magazine, remains the most succinct statement of Poetry’s mission: to print the best poetry written today, in whatever style, genre, or approach. The magazine established its reputation early by publishing the first important poems of T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, H.D., William Carlos Williams, Carl Sandburg, and other now-classic authors. In succeeding decades it has presented—often for the first time—works by virtually every major contemporary poet.

About the Poetry Foundation
The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. The Poetry Foundation seeks to be a leader in shaping a receptive climate for poetry by developing new audiences, creating new avenues for delivery, and encouraging new kinds of poetry through innovative literary prizes and programs. For more information, please visit www.poetryfoundation.org.

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