Chicago Walking Tour
Credits & Sources

With many thanks to all the poets, publishers, and estates that helped make the Chicago Poetry Tour possible, and with special gratitude to the memory of Utah Phillips and Studs Terkel, who both gave generous support to this project.

Scott Simon, Narrator (Downtown Tour)
Patti McKenny, Narrator
Richard Steele, Narrator

Ed Herrmann, Writer/Producer
Curtis Fox, Audio Consultant
Kathleen Judge, Illustrator
Katie Hartsock, Researcher

The Chicago Poetry Tour was created by the Poetry Foundation, in collaboration with Sourcelab. Musical selections were provided by Delmark Records.
  
Copyright © 2009 Poetry Foundation

Chicago Poetry Tour Supplementary Links
Literary Rights
Music Sources
Audio Rights
Image Sources

Chicago Poetry Tour Supplementary Links

www.boaeditions.org
www.buckyhalker.com
www.chicagohistory.org
www.chipublib.org
www.delmark.com
www.flickr.com/creativecommons/
www.fsgbooks.com
www.graywolfpress.org
www.jazzmart.com
www.kessinger.net
www.loc.gov/rr/print/catalog.html
www.lsu.edu/lsupress/
www.moyerbellbooks.com
www.newberry.org
www.poets.org
www.press.uchicago.edu
www.randomhouse.com
www.shoutfactory.com
www.slampapi.com
www.sourcebooks.com
www.spuytenduyvil.net
www.thirdworldpressinc.com
www.tiachucha.com
www.ucpress.edu
www.wavepoetry.com
www.wwnorton.com

LITERARY RIGHTS

Michael Anania, “And This Is Free” (Maxwell Street). In Natural Light, Moyer Bell, 1999.

Anonymous, “The Two Bums” (Haymarket). THE HOBO’S HORNBOOK: A Repertory for a Gutter Jongleur. Collected and annotated by George Milburn. Ives Washburn, 1930.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “Primer for Blacks” (Cultural Center). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “kitchenette building” (Hall Library 1). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “the rites for Cousin Vit” (Hall Library 1). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “The Bean Eaters” (Hall Library 1). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “Riot” (Hall Library 2). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “We Real Cool” (Hall Library 2). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “Mayor Harold Washington” (Harold Washington Library). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “A Song in the Front Yard” (Harold Washington Library). Reprinted by consent of Brooks Permissions.

Ana Castillo, “Daddy with Chesterfields in a Rolled-Up Sleeve” (Pilsen). My Father Was a Toltec: Selected Poems. Copyright © 1995 by Ana Castillo. Published by Anchor Books, an imprint of Random House, Inc. First published by West End Press. Reprinted by permission of Susan Bergholtz Literary Services, New York, NY and Lamy, NM.

W. S. Di Piero, “Chicago and December” (Art Institute). Published in Poetry magazine, June 2006. Used with permission of the author.

George Dillon, “Marching Song” (Walking to Library). Published in Poetry, 1928. Used with permission of Nan Sherman Sussman.

Stuart Dybek, “Windy City” (Art Institute). Streets in Their Own Ink by Stuart Dybek, © 2004 by Stuart Dybek. Used by permission of Farrar Straus and Giroux, LLC.

www.fsgbooks.com

Stuart Dybek, “Bath” (Pilsen). Streets in Their Own Ink by Stuart Dybek, © 2004 by Stuart Dybek. Used by permission of Farrar Straus and Giroux, LLC.

www.fsgbooks.com

Reginald Gibbons, “Train Above Pedestrians” (The El). Creature of a Day, LSU Press, 2008.

Albert Goldbarth, “Shawl” (Harold Washington Library). The Kitchen Sink: New and Selected Poems 1972-2007, Graywolf Press, 2007.

Edward Hirsch, “Branch Library” (Harold Washington Library). Special Orders, Random House, 2008.

Tyehimba Jess, “Martha Promise Receives Leadbelly, 1935” (Chess Records). Leadbelly, Wave Books, 2005.

Quraysh Ali Lansana, “long way home” (DuSable). They Shall Run: Harriet Tubman Poems, Third World Press, 2007.

Quraysh Ali Lansana, “faithless” (DuSable). They Shall Run: Harriet Tubman Poems, Third World Press, 2007.

Quraysh Ali Lansana, “hole” (DuSable). They Shall Run: Harriet Tubman Poems, Third World Press, 2007.

Li-Young Lee, “The Cleaving” (New Chinatown and Cultural Center). The City in Which I Love You, BOA, 1990.

Vachel Lindsay, “Why I Voted the Socialist Ticket” (Cliff Dwellers). Collected Poems of Vachel Lindsay, Kessinger, 2005.

Vachel Lindsay, “The Eagle That Is Forgotten” (Graceland). Collected Poems of Vachel Lindsay, Kessinger, 2005.

Haki Madhubuti, “For the Consideration of Poets” (Cultural Center). Run Towards Fear, Third World Press, 2004.

Haki Madhubuti, “Gwendolyn Brooks” (Hall Library 2). Don’t Cry, Scream, Third World Press, 1969.

Haki Madhubuti “Quality: Gwendolyn Brooks at 73” (South Side Community Arts Center). Heartlove, Third World Press, 1998.

Haki Madhubuti, “Rwanda: Where Tears Have No Power” (South Side Community Arts Center). Heartlove, Third World Press, 1998.

Edgar Lee Masters, “Emily Sparks” (Fine Arts Building). Spoon River Anthology, Prestwick House, Inc., 2007.

Molly Meacham, “This is Chicago” (The El).

Harriet Monroe, “A Farewell” (Graceland). Published in Poetry Magazine, 1936. Used with permission of Ann Monroe.

Lisel Mueller, “Monet Refuses the Operation” (Art Institute). Second Language, Louisiana State University Press, 1986.

John Frederick Nims, “The Caveman and the Train” (Walking to Library). Selected Poems, University of Chicago Press (Phoenix Series) 1982.

Peter O’Leary, “Luminous Great Mass” (Bucktown). Watchfulness, Spuyten Duyvil, 2001.

Sterling Plumpp, “Blues Not Gonna Hide” (Chess Records and Cultural Center). Blues Narratives, Tia Chucha, 1999. Used by permission of author.

Sterling Plumpp, “Ornate with Smoke” (Velvet Lounge). Ornate With Smoke, Third World Press, 1998. Used by permission of author.

Srikanth Reddy, “Fundamentals of Esperanto” (Bucktown). Facts for Visitors by Srikanth Reddy. © 2005 The Regents of the University of California. Published by University of California Press.

Lola Ridge, “Chicago” (Art Institute). Published in Poetry, March 1924. Used with permission of Elaine Sprout.

Carl Sandburg, “Windy City” (Cultural Center). The Complete Poems of Carl Sandburg, Harcourt, 2003.

Carl Sandburg, “Graceland” (Graceland). The Complete Poems of Carl Sandburg, Harcourt, 2005.

Carl Sandburg, “Chicago” (Stock Yard Gate). The Complete Poems of Carl Sandburg, Harcourt, 2004.

Karl Shapiro, “The Alphabet” (Newberry Library). Selected Poems (New York: Library of America, 2003). Copyright © 2003 by Estate of Karl Shapiro. Reprinted with the permission of Wieser & Elwell, Inc.

T-Bone Slim, “The Lumberjack’s Prayer” (Haymarket).

Marc Smith, “Nightbound” (The El).

Margaret Walker, “For My People” (35th and King). The Oxford Anthology of African American Poetry (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006). Used with the permission of the Estate of Margaret Walker Alexander.


MUSIC SOURCES

The music heard in this tour was generously provided by Delmark Records, recording Chicago blues and jazz for over 50 years.

CULTURAL CENTER
"Left Turn on Blue" by Dave Specter, from "Left Turn on Blue" 
"Pick Up On Tab, Part 1" by Tab Smith, from "Delmark - 50 Years of Jazz & Blues"

ART INSTITUTE
"Deep Blue Bruise" from Deep Blue Organ Trio "Deep Blue Bruise"

FINE ARTS BUILDING
"Killer Jack"  by Dave Specter, from "Left Turn on Blue" 

HAROLD WASHINGTON LIBRARY
"Wilhelmenia" by Cecil Payne, from "Delmark - 50 Years of Jazz & Blues" 

MAXWELL STREET
"Deep Down South" by Carey Bell, from "This Is the Blues Harmonica"
"Sad Letter" by Muddy Waters, from "My Home Is in the Delta"

CHESS RECORDS
"You Shook Me" by Muddy Waters, from "The Chess Box"
"Feel Like Going Home" by Muddy Waters, from "My Home Is in the Delta"
"911" by Willie Kent (lyrics by Sterling Plumpp), from "Too Hurt to Cry"  

VELVET LOUNGE
"Fanfare for the Warriors" by The Art Ensemble of Chicago, from "Fanfare for the Warriors" 
"By Many Names" by Fred Anderson, from "Timeless"

DUSABLE MUSEUM
"Follow the Drinking Gourd" by Taj Mahal

BRONZEVILLE
"Royal Garden Blues" by The Windy City Six, from "Delmark - 50 Years of Jazz & Blues"

HALL LIBRARY
"You Talkin' to Me?" by Von Freeman & Frank Catalano, from "Delmark - 50 Years of Jazz & Blues"

These recordings are available from the Jazz Record Mart, 27 E. Illinois, Chicago, IL, 60611. 

http://www.delmark.com
http://jazzmart.com

AUDIO RIGHTS

Michael Anania, “And This Is Free” (Maxwell Street). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Moyer Bell.

Anonymous, “The Two Bums” (Haymarket). From the “IWW Rebel Voices” CD. Used with permission of Utah Phillips.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “Primer for Blacks” (Cultural Center). From the Academy of American Poets “Lucille Clifton & Gwendolyn Brooks: 1983 Guggenheim Reading.” This recording is part of the Academy of American Poets Audio Archive, online at www.poets.org, and is used with permission. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “kitchenette building” (Hall Library 1). From the “Poets in Person” radio show with Joseph Parisi. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “the rites for Cousin Vit” (Hall Library 1). From “Poems to a Listener,” produced by Henry Lyman, WFCR-FM, 1980. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “The Bean Eaters” (Hall Library 1). From the “Poets in Person” radio show with Joseph Parisi. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “Riot” (Hall Library 2). From the Academy of American Poets “Lucille Clifton & Gwendolyn Brooks: 1983 Guggenheim Reading.” This recording is part of the Academy of American Poets Audio Archive, online at www.poets.org, and is used with permission. Used with consent of Brooks Permission.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “We Real Cool” (Hall Library 2). From “Poems to a Listener,” produced by Henry Lyman, WFCR-FM, 1980. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “Mayor Harold Washington” (Harold Washington Library). From the Academy of American Poets “Lucille Clifton & Gwendolyn Brooks: 1983 Guggenheim Reading.” This recording is part of the Academy of American Poets Audio Archive, online at www.poets.org, and is used with permission. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “A Song in the Front Yard” (Harold Washington Library). From Poetry Speaks (Disc 3) Sourcebooks Media Fusion at sourcebooks.com. Used with consent of Brooks Permissions.

Ana Castillo, “Daddy with Chesterfields in a Rolled-Up Sleeve” (Pilsen). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with author’s permission and with consent of Susan Bergholtz Literary Services.

W. S. Di Piero, “Chicago and December” (Art Institute). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with author’s permission.

George Dillon, “Marching Song” (Walking to Library). Read by Christian Wiman, recorded by Ed Herrmann. Used with permission of Nan Sherman Sussman.

Stuart Dybek, “Windy City” (Art Institute). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

Stuart Dybek, “Bath” (Art Institute). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

Reginald Gibbons, “Train Above Pedestrians” (The El). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Louisiana State University Press.

Albert Goldbarth, “Shawl” (Harold Washington Library). Recorded by Curtis Fox; used with permission of author and Graywolf Press.

Edward Hirsch, “Branch Library” (Harold Washington Library). Recorded by Curtis Fox; used with permission of author and Random House.

Tyehimba Jess, “Martha Promise Receives Leadbelly, 1935” (Chess Records). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Wave Books.

Quraysh Ali Lansana, “long way home” (DuSable Museum). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Quraysh Ali Lansana, “faithless” (DuSable Museum). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Quraysh Ali Lansana, “hole” (DuSable Museum). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Li-Young Lee, “The Cleaving” (New Chinatown and Cultural Center). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and BOA Editions.

Vachel Lindsay, “Why I Voted the Socialist Ticket” (Cliff Dwellers). Read by John Rieger; recorded by Ed Herrmann.

Vachel Lindsay, “The Eagle That Is Forgotten” (Graceland). Read by John Rieger; recorded by Ed Herrmann.

Haki Madhubuti, “For the Consideraton of Poets” (Cultural Center). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Haki Madhubuti, “Gwendolyn Brooks” (Hall Library 2). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Haki Madhubuti, “Quality: Gwendolyn Brooks at 73” (South Side Community Arts Center). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Haki Madhubuti. “Rwanda: Where Tears Have No Power” (South Side Community Arts Center). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Edgar Lee Masters, “Emily Sparks” (Fine Arts Building). From Poetry on Record Disc 1, Shout! Factory, 2006, at www.shoutfactory.com. Used with permission of Hilary Masters.

Molly Meacham “This is Chicago” (The El). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author.

Harriet Monroe, “A Farewell” (Graceland). Read by Danielle Chapman and recorded by Ed Herrmann. Used with permission of Ann Monroe.

Lisel Mueller, “Monet Refuses the Operation” (Art Institute). From Poetry on Record Disc 2, Shout! Factory, 2006, at www.shoutfactory.com. Used with permission of author and Louisiana State University Press.

John Frederick Nims, “The Caveman and the Train” (Walking to Library). From a 1961 Arts Club reading, courtesy of the Poetry Foundation archives. Used with permission of the University of Chicago Press.

Peter O’Leary, “Luminous Great Mass” (Bucktown). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Spuyten Duyvil.

Sterling Plumpp, “Blues Not Gonna Hide” (Chess Records and Cultural Center). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author.

Sterling Plumpp, “Ornate with Smoke” (Velvet Lounge). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and Third World Press.

Srikanth Reddy, “Fundamentals of Esperanto” (Bucktown). Recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of author and University of California Press.

Lola Ridge, “Chicago” (Art Institute). Read by Danielle Chapman and recorded by Ed Herrmann; used with permission of Elaine Sprout.

Carl Sandburg, “Windy City” (Cultural Center). From Sandburg Reads Sandburg, Decca, 1958. Used with permission of Universal Music.

Carl Sandburg, “Graceland” (Graceland). Read by Marc Smith and recorded by Ed Herrmann.

Carl Sandburg, “Chicago” (Stock Yard Gate). Read by Marc Smith and recorded by Ed Herrmann.

Karl Shapiro, “The Alphabet” (Newberry Library). From “Poets in Person” radio show with Joseph Parisi. Used with permission of the Estate of Karl Shapiro and of Wieser & Elwell, Inc.

T-Bone Slim, “The Lumberjack’s Prayer” (Haymarket). Read by Studs Terkel, from Bucky Halker’s “I Don’t Want Your Millions” CD. Used with permission of Bucky Halker, at buckyhalker.com.

Marc Smith, “Nightbound” (The El). From Marc Smith’s “It’s About Time” CD. Used with permission of Marc Smith.

Margaret Walker, “For My People” (35th and King). From “For My People—The Life and Writing of Margaret Walker,” a film produced by Juneteenth Productions. Used with permission of Juneteenth Productions and the Estate of Margaret Walker Alexander.

IMAGE SOURCES

CULTURAL CENTER

Cultural Center, 1957; Chicago History Museum (i51414)
Chicago Skyline, 1912; Library of Congress
Wrigley Square, Millenium Park; Creative Commons, Prateek Bahadur
Cultural Center; Ed Herrmann
Cultural Center; Ed Herrmann
Columbian Exposition, 1893; Chicago History Museum (i27812; PH-Kilburn)
The Green Mill; Katie Hartsock
Cultural Center; Katie Hartsock
Michigan Avenue in 1861; Chicago History Museum (i04423; Engraver-Raoul Varin)
Cultural Center Inscription; Ed Herrmann
Preston Bradley Hall; Ed Herrmann
Cultural Center, 1971; Chicago History Museum (i51412)

ART INSTITUTE

Art Institute of Chicago; Creative Commons, Wally Gobetz
IL Central Rail Yard, 1928; Chicago History Museum (DN-0085147)
Art Institute Sculpture Garden; Katie Hartsock
Art Institute, 1905; Chicago History Museum
Michigan Avenue, 1861; Chicago History Museum (i04423; Engraver-Raoul Varin)
Art Institute, 1928; Chicago History Museum (i19219; PH-Barnes/Crosby)
Michigan & Washington; Ed Herrmann
Art Institute Bronze Lions; Katie Hartsock
Art Institute of Chicago; Ed Herrmann
Art Institute Bronze Lions; Katie Hartsock
Art Institute, ca. 1920s; Chicago History Museum (i51415)

CLIFF DWELLERS CLUB

Cliff Dwellers Club; Katie Hartsock
Symphony Center; Ed Herrmann
Cliff Dwellers Dining Room; Ed Herrmann
Street View; Katie Hartsock
200 S Michigan Ave; Katie Hartsock
View from Cliff Dwellers Club; Ed Herrmann
Cliff Dwellers Club; Ed Herrmann

FINE ARTS BUILDING

Fine Arts Building; Katie Hartsock
Artists’ Snack Shop; Katie Hartsock
Fine Arts Building, 1900; Library of Congress
The Dial; Newberry Library
Fine Arts Building; Ed Herrmann
Fine Arts Building Entrance; Katie Hartsock
The Little Review; Newberry Library
Fine Arts Building Murals; Ed Herrmann
Fine Arts Building Murals; Ed Herrmann
Fine Arts Building Theater; Ed Herrmann
Fine Arts Building; Katie Hartsock
Edgar Lee Masters; Library of Congress
Reedy’s Mirror; Newberry Library
Spoon River Anthology; Newberry Library

WALKING TO HAROLD WASHINGTON

Michigan & Congress; Katie Hartsock
Chicago Skyline, 1912; Library of Congress
Michigan & Congress, 1958; Chicago History Museum (i27074)
Poetry Magazine, 1912; Katie Hartsock
Rail Yard at 12th St., ca. 1906; Library of Congress

HAROLD WASHINGTON LIBRARY

Harold Washington Library, Creative Commons
Library El Stop, at Van Buren & State; Katie Hartsock
Harold Washington Library; Katie Hartsock
Harold Washington Inauguration, 1983; Chicago Public Library Special Collections Division
Harold Washington Statue; Katie Hartsock
Harold Washington Library; Katie Hartsock
Harold Washington Library; Katie Hartsock
Harold Washington Library; Katie Hartsock

THE EL

El Train above Congress; Katie Hartsock
El Stop at Lake & State; Katie Hartsock
View from El Train Window; Ed Herrmann
El Stop; Ed Herrmann
El over Adams; Katie Hartsock
El over Congress; Katie Hartsock
El over Van Buren; Katie Hartsock
Elevated Control Tower, 1895; Chicago History Museum (i05391)
Library El Stop, at Van Buren & State; Katie Hartsock
El Stop, Congress & Wabash; Katie Hartsock
Street View from an El Train; Ed Herrmann
El Train Reflected; Ed Herrmann
El Stop, Lake & State; Katie Hartsock

HAYMARKET MONUMENT

Haymarket Monument; Ed Herrmann
Haymarket Square, 1893; Library of Congress
Attention Workingmen!; Library of Congress
Monument Inscription; Ed Herrmann
Deering Works, 1907; Library of Congress
Haymarket Monument; Katie Hartsock
Studs Terkel, 1960; Chicago History Museum (i32424)
Haymarket Monument; Ed Herrmann
Haymarket Monument; Katie Hartsock
Picket Line, 1941; Library of Congress

STOCK YARD GATE

Union Stock Yard Gate; Katie Hartsock
Union Stock Yards, 1906; Library of Congress
Union Stock Yards, ca. 1940s; Chicago Public Library Special Collections Division
Union Stock Yards, 1900; Chicago Public Library Special Collections Division
Union Stock Yards, ca. 1940s; Chicago Public Library Special Collections Division
Union Stock Yards, ca. 1900; Library of Congress
Union Stock Yard Gate; Katie Hartsock

CHESS RECORDS

Chess Records; Katie Hartsock
Lonnie Johnson, 1941; Getty Images
Chess Records Poster; Creative Commons, Seth Anderson
Muddy Waters, 1964; Library of Congress
Jazz and Blues Sculptures; Katie Hartsock
South Side Tavern, 1941; Getty Images
Chess Records; Katie Hartsock
Willie Dixon Blues Garden; Katie Hartsock
Jazz and Blues Sculptures; Katie Hartsock
Chess Records; Katie Hartsock
Leadbelly & Martha Promise, 1935; Library of Congress

VELVET LOUNGE

The Velvet Lounge; Katie Hartsock
Velvet Lounge Poster, 2006
Fred Anderson; Creative Commons, Seth Tisue

MAXWELL STREET

Maxwell Street Crowds, 1939; Chicago Public Library Special Collections Division
Maxwell Street, 1959; Chicago History Museum
Maxwell Street Vendors, 1939; Chicago History Museum
New Maxwell Street Market; Creative Commons, Melanie Innis
Maxwell Street Chilis; Creative Commons, Terence Faircloth
New Maxwell Street Market; Creative Commons, Terence Faircloth
Muddy Waters, 1964; Library of Congress

GRACELAND CEMETERY

Graceland Cemetery Entrance; Ed Herrmann
Kimball Memorial; Ed Herrmann
Palmer Memorial; Ed Herrmann
Ryerson Mausoleum; Ed Herrmann
Altgeld Tombstone; Ed Herrmann
Graceland Cemetery, ca. 1883; Chicago History Museum (i51408: PH-Copelin)
Graceland Pond, 1993; Chicago History Museum (I39462; PH-McCarthy)

NEW CHINATOWN

New Chinatown; Ed Herrmann
Hon Kee Restaurant; Ed Herrmann
Hon Kee Restaurant; Ed Herrmann
New Chinatown El Stop; Katie Hartsock
New Chinatown El Stop; Katie Hartsock

NEWBERRY LIBRARY

Newberry Library, 1993; Chicago History Museum (i51417)
Newberry Library; Katie Hartsock
Newberry Library entrance; Katie Hartsock
Washington Square; Katie Hartsock

BUCKTOWN

Milwaukee Ave; Katie Hartsock
Danny’s Tavern; Katie Hartsock
Myopic Books; Katie Hartsock
Myopic Books; Katie Hartsock
Danny’s Tavern; Katie Hartsock
Holy Trinity Orthodox Church; Creative Commons, Grant Davis
Holy Trinity Orthodox Church; Creative Commons, Jeremy Atherton
The Green Mill; Katie Hartsock
Bus Stop by The Green Mill, 1986; Chicago History Museum
The Green Mill Stage; Creative Commons
Stella by Starlight; The Green Mill

PILSEN

18th & Blue Island, 1961; Chicago History Museum (i51411)
18th & Blue Island; Katie Hartsock
Lozano Library; Katie Hartsock
18th & Blue Island; Katie Hartsock
Pilsen Murals; Creative Commons, Brian Boyer
Pilsen Murals; Creative Commons, Brian Boyer
18th & Blue Island; Katie Hartsock

DUSABLE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

DuSable Museum of African American History; Katie Hartsock
DuSable Museum of African American History; Katie Hartsock
Harriet Tubman, ca. 1860s; Library of Congress
Harriet Tubman, 1911; Library of Congress

VICTORY MONUMENT

Victory Monument; Katie Hartsock
E 63rd St El Tracks, 1946; Chicago History Museum (i24632; PH-Benar Studio)
47th Street, 1958; Chicago History Museum (i39002; PH-Copelin)
Margaret Walker with Poets; Library of Congress
Victory Monument; Katie Hartsock

HALL LIBRARY PART 1

George Cleveland Hall Library; Katie Hartsock
George Cleveland Hall Library, 1957; Chicago History Museum (i51410)
Bronzeville, 1941; Library of Congress
South Side Kitchennette, 1941; Library of Congress
George Cleveland Hall Library; Katie Hartsock
South Side Kitchennette, 1941; Library of Congress

HALL LIBRARY PART 2

George Cleveland Hall Library, 1957; Chicago History Museum (i51409)
George Cleveland Hall Library; Katie Hartsock
South Side Kitchennette, 1941; Library of Congress
South Side Kitchennette, 1941; Library of Congress

SOUTH SIDE COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER

South Side Community Arts Center
SSCAC Art Exhibition, 1945; Library of Congress
SSCAC Painting Class, 1945; Library of Congress
SSCAC Poetry Circle, 1945; Library of Congress
Painting Student, SSCAC, 1945; Library of Congress

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

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This poem has related audio.