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Broetry, brah.

By Harriet Staff

As if the phrase “Bromance”—brought about in large part by Judd Apatow movies—weren’t enough, we can now add “Broetry” to the lexicon. This term comes from the mind, and collection, of “Broet Laureate” Brian McGackin.

McGackin spoke with Guy Raz at NPR’s All Things Considered about the fictional evolution of broetry (“broetry originated centuries ago high atop the mountains of feudal Japan”), while also reading a few broems (listen to the audio).

A few choice nugs (dude!) from the interview:

“Broetry is poetry for dudes,” Brian McGackin writes in the introduction to his new collection of poems. “It’s poetry for people who don’t like poetry.

“A lot of poets have broetic qualities,” he says. “Robert Frost liked baseball; he wrote about sports. His poetry was always very accessible. Even Shakespeare — Shakespeare was just writing about chicks.”

If you think you don’t like poetry, you just haven’t found a poem that’s right for you,” McGackin says. “Broetry is poetry that’s right for you. Broetry is a literary chili cheeseburger.”

And here’s the write-up from the Quirk Books website:

As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds, birch trees, and menstruation, regular guys are left scratching their heads. Who can speak for Everyman? Who will articulate his love for Xbox 360, for Mama Celeste’s frozen pizza, for the cinematic oeuvre of Bruce Willis?

Enter Broetry-a stunning debut from a dazzling new literary voice. “Broet Laureate” Brian McGackin goes where no poet has gone before-to Star Wars conventions, to frat parties, to video game tournaments, and beyond. With poems like “Ode to That Girl I Dated for, Like, a Month Sophomore Year” and “My Friends Who Don’t Have Student Loans,” we follow the Bro from his high school graduation and college experience through a “quarter-life crisis” and beyond.

Brian McGackin has degrees from Emerson College and the University of Southern California. He lives in Los Angeles. This is his first book.

Sweet.


Posted in Poetry News on Monday, July 25th, 2011 by Harriet Staff.