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Chloris <em>a più voci</em> (Translation as Reperformance, Part 2)

Featured Blogger

As a child I lived with a reproduction of an image of Sandro Botticelli’s Chloris—just the detail of the nymph’s face in torment, looking back, a stalk black—with age?—in her open mouth—on the wall of my parents’ living room. It hung there amidst the array of bizarre elaborated objects yielded from people’s garages and the […]

Reconstructing Sappho’s Lonely Night

Poetry News

Ars Technica reports on a team of physicists and an astronomer who discovered the time of year that Sappho witnessed the constellation Pleiades, referenced in her “Midnight Poem,” with a software package called Starry Night. Their findings, originally published in the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, reveal a new method of “close reading” by […]

Google Brain’s AI Turns Out Poetry After Reading Thousands of Romance Novels

Poetry News

Google’s AI interface read 2,865 romance novels, and came up with poetry? “The experimental parameters are simple and might actually make for a fun group writing game of some sort. The team gave the AI a starting sentence and an ending sentence. Then they asked artificial intelligence to bridge the two concepts using up to […]

Unearthing Emily Dickinson’s Gardens

Poetry News

New York Times’s Ferris Jabr joins Kerry Lynch and company, from Archaeological Services at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, to uncover and restore the fabled gardens on the Dickinson estate. According to literary scholar Judith Farr, during her lifetime, Emily Dickinson was “known more widely as a gardener, perhaps, than as a poet.” More: Some […]

Poetry News

Tonight, if you’re in New York City, you’d do well to check out Belladonna* Collaborative, Tamaas, and 98 Weeks/Research Project Space at their night of international protest readings for Egyptian writer Ahmed Naji, who has been imprisoned for the language he used in his novel, The Use of Life. This marks a follow-up event, after […]

Reading List: May 2016

From Poetry Magazine

The Reading List is a feature of Poetry magazine’s Editors’ Blog. This month contributors to the May 2016 issue share some books that held their interest. Robert Adamson I have just received my copy of Peter O’Leary’s new book The Sampo. O’Leary’s poetry transports me to a place where the act of reading is like […]

At <em>Open Space</em>: Paul Ebenkamp’s Mind in the Form of a List Includes Xenakis, John Wiese, Pigeons

Poetry News

Poet and musician Paul Ebenkamp makes the links the thing in his “Listworthy” at Open Space. Listworthy engages smart people. “What’s on their minds, bookshelves, browsers; what inspires, attracts, or distracts them?” How about we simply snag a few. But find more of Ebenkamp’s mind-shelves–which include pigeons and raccoons!–here. Catherine Christer Hennix and Choru(s)san Time-Court […]

‘Metaphors are all we have to describe memory’: Kristin Prevallet’s ‘A Burning Is Not A Letting Go’ at <em>Guernica</em>

Poetry News

In response to Freud’s Civilization and Its Discontents, the theories of Oliver Sachs, and verse by Palestinian-American poet Fady Joudah—in collaboration with Suzanne Levine’s photography—poet Kristin Prevallet discovers the meaning of memory in this trans-genre personal essay published by Guernica. The essay accompanies Levine and Prevallet’s image and word collaboration called “Nothing Erased But Much […]

Bloof Books Publishes CAConrad ‘Censored Interview’ With Library of Congress

Poetry News

It appears that The Library of Congress asked CAConrad to participate in a new interview series with poets, only to turn around afterward and decline to run the piece! Lucky for us, and not so much for LOC, Shanna Compton at Bloof Books has published “The Library of Congress* CENSORED INTERVIEW,” as it is now […]

On Poetry & Social Change: Claudia Rankine Discusses Adrienne Rich at <em>New Yorker</em>

Poetry News

In the most recent New Yorker, Claudia Rankine discusses Adrienne Rich’s impact on her poetry, and explores Rich’s lifelong engagement with literature and social justice movements. More: In answer to the question “Does poetry play a role in social change?,” Adrienne Rich once answered: Yes, where poetry is liberative language, connecting the fragments within us, […]

Translation as (Re)Performance (Part 1: Moonstriking)

Featured Blogger

In 2014, after fourteen years of reading, researching, and translating the poetry of the polyglot poet Amelia Rosselli, I found myself faced in terms more immediate than ever with the task of transmitting her voice to an English-speaking audience. Invited to present at a salon in Madison, I decided to read from my recently published […]

Staying Alive With Laura Sims at <em>Fjords Review</em>

Poetry News

At Fjords Review, Sean Speers reviews Laura Sims’s newest, Staying Alive (Ugly Duckling Presse)! “Sims has created a pastiche of the most memorable tales of the world’s end, then ‘Gutted, slashed//And gutted’ until all that remains are those images which are most brilliantly haunting and hauntingly brilliant.” More: She borrows from Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, […]

David Lau Reviews Piotr Gwiazda’s Critical Study of American Poetry

Poetry News

David Lau has penned a long review of poet, translator, and literary critic Piotr Gwiazda’s book US Poetry in the Age of Empire 1979-2012 (Palgrave Books, 2014) for the new issue of New Left Review. “Piotr Gwiazda’s new critical study aims to shed light on the public vocation of American poetry in the period stretching […]

<em>Fader</em> Introduces Readers to Jamila Woods

Poetry News

“Modern-day Renaissance woman” Jamila Woods is the subject of an article at Fader. In addition to collaborating with Macklemore and Ryan Lewis on “White Privilege II,” the 26 year old debuts a new single, “Blk Grl Soldier.” More: On any given day, Jamila Woods might climb into bed accompanied by a stack of books, a […]

Reading Wordsworth Into the Work of Lisa Robertson

Poetry News

The Critical Flame: A Journal of Literature and Culture has our attention today with this swerving and generous essay by Zacharia Wells on Lisa Robertson’s Cinema of the Present (Coach House, 2014). In seeking a connection from Robertson’s book-length poem to Wordsworth’s The Prelude, Wells realized that “one had precious little to do with the […]

A Handful of Chisels: On Stones & Poetry by Claire Potter

From Poetry Magazine

Each month we feature a guest post from a contributor to Poetry’s current issue. Claire Potter’s poem “The Art of Sideways” appears in the May 2016 issue. Previous posts in this series can be found on the Editors’ Blog. In August 1913, Freud took a summer walk through the Dolomites with two friends, one of them being perhaps […]

Just Buffalo Celebrates 40 Years of Making Western New York Great

Poetry News

Hats off to Just Buffalo Literary Center: illuminating Western New York for 40 years through writing workshops and literary readings. As part of the center’s birthday celebration, it’s in the midst of a fundraising campaign to raise $1,000,000 in order to to fully establish the Writing Center, expand marketing and community outreach, and create a […]

Emma Ramadan Talks About Translating & Writing Genderless Characters

Poetry News

Emma Ramadan, translator of writer, professor, and Oulipo member Anne Garréta’s Sphinx (Deep Vellum 2015), talks to The Atlantic about how she came to the novel (originally written almost 30 years ago); the challenge of writing genderless characters (“I would slap myself on the wrist when I was talking about one of the characters and […]

<em>Guardian</em> Reviews Greek Poets’ <em>Austerity Measures</em>

Poetry News

Hold up! “A new kind of poetry is flourishing in Greece’s streets, bars and cafes,” the Guardian reports. This adventurous new verse, the likes of which, unseen since the country’s dictatorship in the ’70s, is brought to you by a new anthology called Austerity Measures which features poets Eftychia Panayiotou, Thomas Tsalapatis, Danae Sioziou, Jazra […]

RIP Michael S. Harper (1938–2016)

Poetry News

Michael S. Harper, whose work “interwove his personal experiences as a black man with an expansive view of a history shared by black and white Americans,” has died. Born in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, he earned a B.A. and M.A. at California State University, Los Angeles, then earned an M.F.A. at the University of Iowa Writers’ […]