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<em>Fanzine</em> Infiltrates <em>The Garden:</em> Ed Steck and Paul Cunningham in Conversation

Poetry News

Whoa, hey there buddy! Whatever you’re doing right now, stop that and read this: it’s Ed Steck and Paul Cunningham’s conversation about writing, disappearances, borders, Eden, holograms, and more, now live at Fanzine and it will totally rock your world! PC: [...] Why are you writing, Ed? Why did you write The Garden? ES: [...] [...]

<em>Entropy’</em>s Sage Advice for Winning the Yale Younger Prize

Poetry News

Entropy has some good advice for those interested in the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition. Well all right! Thomas Cook says, among other things: 3. Do submit your manuscript in 1920, 1921, 1922, or 1923.3 4. Be a man.4 5. Change your name to John.5 6. If you don’t like the name John, consider [...]

‘Words Called Up to Answer Image’: At <em>Los Angeles Review of Books</em> B.K. Fischer Invokes Louise Bourgeois

Poetry News

Magnifique! B.K. Fischer writes all things Bourgeois including her many literary admirers at a most recent installment of LARB. We love both Fischer’s incisive commentary on Bourgeois’s art and choice inclusion of threads belletristic throughout. IT’S HARD NOT to love an artist who can craft a bronze phallus, exhibit it on a meat hook, then [...]

‘Pour la beauté du geste’ / Leos Carax, Poet of the Cinema

Poetry News

At the Frieze blog, Tom von Logue Newth wrote, in 2012, about one of our favorite directors, and “real assumed” “poet of the cinema,” Leos Carax. There are not many poets left in the cinema. Perhaps the poet is always something of a throwback, a reminder of former glories. ‘Now I feel I make films [...]

Belladonna’s August Ideal + Contribute to Celebratory Folio for <em>Theory, A Sunday</em>!

Poetry News

Just the other weekday, we were waxing most positive about Theory, A Sunday–now’s your chance to respond. If you haven’t seen this already: Lemounhound is asking for 300-800 words on the way this work may have affected you. An important call, so we thought we’d note it. Submit! More info below: In celebration of Quebec’s [...]

Academy of American Poets Makes Education a Priority With New Honorary Position

Poetry News

Just announced: A new honorary position has been established at The Academy of American Poets! Dr. Madeleine Fuchs Holzer has joined the organization as its first Educator in Residence. “This honorary position reflects the Academy’s long-standing commitment to supporting K-12 teachers and encouraging young people to engage with the art of poetry,” they write. More [...]

A Most Substantial Loot: Holland Cotter Reviews <em>Not Nothing</em> at <em>New York Times</em>

Poetry News

He’s taking over! Site of Ray Johnson’s most recent habitation? Why, it’s the New York Times dear hearts, where Holland Cotter has these kindnesses to say about the recently published Ray Johnson phantasmagoria, Not Nothing (Siglio Press, 2014): Born in working-class Detroit in 1927, he was turning out elaborately illustrated letters to friends even in [...]

More Than a Fetish Object: The Open Book Project

Poetry News

A good piece is up at The Atlantic on diminishing the binary between print and digital–it raises important poets for us book-lusters: What about the possible impulse to romanticize physical books just for sentimental, nostalgic reasons? “According to Marx,” Atzmon says, “fetishized objects seduce people into vesting them with a spirit and a will, what [...]

Boris Pasternak: ‘Poems Are Unimportant’

Poetry News

There’s an interesting piece on Boris Pasternak’s literary fame and misfortune over at Bookforum. Steven G. Kellman is here reviewing The Zhivago Affair, co-authored by Peter Finn and Petra Couvée, “a riveting account of how Doctor Zhivago came to be written, released, revered, and reviled.” But Pasternak was a leading poet before the novel changed [...]

Qasida

Featured Blogger

I have trouble thinking about form in poetry. From a wide view, it makes rough sense—a poem has a different form than a novel, Western than Rom-Com, opera than pop song. But that’s genre, not form, isn’t it? Same at the level of the page. I can see the difference between short, skinny lines and [...]

Kevin Killian Interviewed at <em>HTMLGIANT</em>

Poetry News

At HTMLGIANT, Matt L. Rohrer talks to Kevin Killian about his new book from Wonder, Tweaky Village! Chosen by Macgregor Card for the first-annual Wonder Poetry Prize, Tweaky Village is “a wild and ranging collection of poems/narratives that deal with the author’s response to free-market capitalism, the constraints of the English language, the repetitious nature [...]

Searing Analyses: Marianne Morris’s <em>The On All Said Things Moratorium</em>

Poetry News

Hooray: Eleanor Perry reviewed Marianne Morris’s The On All Said Things Moratorium (Enitharmon Books 2014) for The Shearsman Review. We carry this book around with us, so we’re glad to see it writ up. Perry gets to the point: “Readers who like their meanings lucid and easily accessible may find many of these poems deliberately [...]

Poet Laureates Come to Life in Edinburgh Exhibition

Poetry News

In tandem with the Edinburgh Art Festival, a new exhibition brings the lives of poets laureate past and present to light at Holyroodhouse, the Queen’s official residence in Scotland, where poets’ laureate personal ephemera and correspondences with royalty are on display. The show, “Poetry for the Palace: Poets Laureate from Dryden to Duffy” takes a [...]

What Does a State Poet Laureate Do Anyway?

Poetry News

Chris Vitiello of North Carolina considers his state’s most recent debacle over the appointment of Valerie Macon, a self-published poet and employee in the state’s Department of Health and Human Services. Who knew that appointing a poet laureate with light publication credentials could cause such a stir? There’s an email that Joseph Bathani keeps handy. [...]

When Maya Angelou Went to Arkansas With Bill Moyers

Poetry News

Bill Moyers celebrates the life and legacy of Maya Angelou in the first of two programs for his venture Moyers & Company. In the first, just up, Moyers “revisits an episode from his 1982 series Creativity in which he and Angelou returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her [...]

Ray Johnson’s in the Spotlight at <em>Bookforum</em>

Poetry News

Bookforum editor Albert Mobilio takes a sneak peek at two Ray Johnson books recently published by Siglio Press: The Paper Snake and Not Nothing. Ray Johnson, an intermedia artist who trained at Black Mountain College before taking New York by storm, is known primarily for his mail art and in particular, a project called The [...]

Rigoberto González Lectures at the Library of Congress

Poetry News

We’ll close out the day by pointing you over to the University of Notre Dame’s Institute for Latino Studies’s Letras Latinas blog for this lecture by Rigoberto González, “Latino Poetry: Pivotal Voices, Era of Transition,” presented at the Library of Congress this past April. González’s lecture references a number of poets, but hones in on [...]

At <em>Guernica:</em> Richard Falk on Poetry, War, and Wallace Stevens

Poetry News

At Guernica, international law and international relations scholar Richard Falk considers the writing of Wallace Stevens while observing the fighting in Gaza. During these days of continuing massacre in Gaza I have found it difficult to focus the mind elsewhere. I came across a short statement of about two hundred words by the great, enigmatic [...]

Keep It In Motion

Featured Blogger

A few weeks back on YouTube, I came across a video Guided By Voices made for one of their recent singles. In it, a magician (played by comedian Jon Glaser) sits in front of a dressing room mirror before a performance, practicing his tricks for the imminent show. You don’t get the idea he’s an [...]

New Development Project Threatens to Destroy Amherst’s Beloved Emily Dickinson Mural

Poetry News

Locals and developers in Amherst, MA, are trying to see Eye to Eye while a building in the town’s center is poised for redevelopment by a firm called Archipelago. The building in question happens to feature a gorgeous, much-beloved, large-scale mural of Emily Dickinson’s face–a centerpiece “framing the historic West Cemetery that fans out beyond [...]