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Harry Mathews Interviewed by Barbara Henning at <em>EOAGH</em>

Poetry News

EOAGH has an interview up with Harry Mathews, conducted by Barbara Henning! These two have been corresponding for years, sayeth BH. This particular conversation focuses on the women of Oulipo, who we don’t often hear much about. “What Harry wanted to talk about was Juliana [Spahr]’s comment [in Looking Up Harryette Mullen], “It is also [...]

Leonard Cohen Reads Early Poems, Considers the Poetic Mind

Poetry News

Open Culture gives us a taste of our own Leonard Cohen, reading poems in 1966, “(Before His Days as a Musician Began).” Content they’ve got: Cohen reading several poems in “the hallowed halls of New York’s 92nd Street Y,” and an early reading of “Prayer for Messiah,” plus plus. Many a singer-songwriter who first rose [...]

George Kalamaras’s <em>A Gray Barn Rising</em>

Poetry News

A few months back we reported on George Kalamaras’s appointment as the poet laureate to the great state of Indiana. This week we found out that as part of his laureateship, he has launched a video series called A Gray Barn Rising. Each week Kalamaras introduces a different poet, from the old standards to poets [...]

Mark Ford Taps Into an America of the Mind

Poetry News

For the Boston Review Blog, Scott Bartley reviews Mark Ford’s Selected Poems, just out from one of our favorite presses, Coffee House. Ford’s the author of a great biography of Raymond Roussel, and has edited books of poetry for both O’Hara and Ashbery. It’s good to see his own work explored in depth. An excerpt [...]

<em>It’s night in San Francisco but it’s sunny in Oakland!</em> On Preorder!

Poetry News

What else could you possibly even remotely be dreaming of doing this summer but reading this exciting new collaborative effort, published by Oakland’s own Timeless, Infinite Light? This new anthology, called It’s night in San Francisco but it’s sunny in Oakland, will knock your socks off. Check it out! What gathers in the pages of [...]

Collecting Sylvia Plath

Featured Blogger

I love the thinginess of things. —Sylvia Plath 1. Black Telephone. Court Green, Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes’s manor house. North Tawton, Devon, England. July 9, 1962. Aurelia Plath was visiting from the States, and mother and daughter had just returned from a shopping trip in Exeter. Earlier in the day, Plath had proudly told [...]

<em>St. Louis Magazine</em> Talks to Patricia Lockwood

Poetry News

Up today at St. Louis Magazine is “Six Questions for Patricia Lockwood!” You know you can’t get enough of the “one-book poet to social media starlet,” as Aaron Belz has it. And if you’re in St. Louis, she’s reading there on Monday night. But then back to literary formation: 3. Let’s move out of the [...]

Good Brains! Maria Lind Deftly Considers Lisa Robertson’s Writings at <em>Art Review</em>

Poetry News

Not sure whether you’re ready to delve into the awesome and powerful literary world of Lisa Robertson? Read Maria Lind’s recent essay about Lisa Robertson and weep, at Art Review. It all began when a friend read me a section of Lisa Robertson’s The Weather (2001) while we were waiting for our flights at an [...]

Your Chance to Own Wallace Stevens’s Home Is at Hand

Poetry News

Indeed, the Hartford, Connecticut house Wallace Stevens lived in while working as an insurance agent and writing his cherished verses is now on sale. If you have a spare $489,900 laying around, it could be yours! Now for the brass tacks about this 1920s Colonial: The 3,900-square-foot home on Westerly Terrace has six bedrooms and [...]

Ara Shirinyan Rocks On at ‘Into the Field’ (<em>Jacket 2</em>)

Poetry News

The latest episode of Steve McLaughlin’s regular Jacket 2 podcast, “Into the Field,” features none other than L.A. poet and publisher, Ara Shirinyan. Shirinyan is one of the co-instigators of the famous Poetic Research Bureau reading series in Los Angeles, and is the author of Syria is in the World (Palm Press, 2007) and Your [...]

Modernists Aplenty! <em>NYT</em> Reviews Kevin Birmingham’s Recent Book on <em>Ulysses</em>

Poetry News

There are so many reasons to get your Modernist on: the latest of which is Kevin Birmingham’s most recently published, and possibly dangerous book, The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s Ulysses. Got a pen? Take down all the relevant data from this review at NYT: Kevin Birmingham’s new book about the long [...]

Lucas de Lima’s <em>Wet Land</em> Reviewed at <em>HTMLGiant</em>

Poetry News

The thorny terrain of the elegy is brought to focus in Marty Cain’s review of Lucas de Lima’s Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) at HTMLGiant. To set the stage, Cain reminds us that “The premise of Wet Land is almost impossibly weird: it’s a book-length response to the death of Lucas de Lima’s close friend [...]

Presto! Lisa Jarnot’s New Book: <em>a princess magic presto spell</em>

Poetry News

Lisa Jarnot has a new book! Published by small press Solid Objects, the “exquisitely-designed hardcover book/chapbook a princess magic presto spell” is reviewed by ever-stalwart rob mclennan over at The Small Press Book Review. Jarnot’s book “blends collage and the list to create a poem aware of large moments, from ‘trapped chilean miners in a [...]

Now Available: Full Texts of Leslie Scalapino Memorial Lectures in 21st Century Poetics by Simone White & Divya Victor

Poetry News

Robin Tremblay-McGaw puts it best: “On the glorious afternoon of June 1st, Small Press Traffic hosted the 4th annual Leslie Scalapino Memorial Lecture in 21st Century Poetics at Timken Hall at the California College of the Arts (CCA). This year the lecture included two of the more provocative Scalapino lectures thus far.” Lecturers were none [...]

I Have a Pettiness to Expiate

Featured Blogger

The other night, I read some of Ann Stanford’s poems at an event at the Poetry Foundation, “The Voice of Women in American Poetry.” I knew Ann Stanford (she was my teacher at California State University, Northridge, in the seventies) and have admired her poems my entire adult life, so it was an honor to [...]

For Those Who Look Yonder: <em>NYT</em> Reviews Robert Frost’s Letters Vol. 1

Poetry News

Yes, few things are as illusive as that man, that mystery: Robert Frost. William Logan recounts, in this fresh-published review of Letters: Volume 1, “He disliked fancy metaphor or decoration (his poems are literature’s answer to Shaker furniture).” Yet Frost’s sentiments about race and gender are far from popular in America today. Learn more and [...]

Interviewing the Founders of <em>Music & Literature</em>

Poetry News

No, not that music and literature. This Music & Literature. Michael Barron of New Directions interviews the founding editors–Taylor Davis-Van Atta and Daniel Medin–after a successful party for the fourth issue that coincided with the launch of The Cahier Series No. 23 Clarice: The Visitor, a poetic meditation on Clarice Lispector by her translator, the [...]

Who Says that Poets Don’t Like Futbol?

Poetry News

We’re still reeling from yesterday’s US v. Portugal match. What a game, right? Well, at Paris Review poet Rowan Ricardo Phillips has been covering the Cup. Check it! The same day that, in Chile, more than twenty previously unknown works by Pablo Neruda were discovered in the most unlikely of places—a drawer—Spain thought it was [...]

‘No Ideas but in Things’: William Carlos Williams’s Influence on Robert Smithson at <em>New Yorker</em>

Poetry News

Who knew that two of our favorite Jersey Boys knew each other at all!? The architect of “Spiral Jetty,” Robert Smithson, was influenced by William Carlos Williams: his pediatrician! Learn more at The New Yorker. In 1959, Robert Smithson, a young abstract painter who would eventually become known as a pioneer of land art, went [...]

The Complicated Matter of Translating Proust

Poetry News

A review of the new translation of Proust’s Swann’s Way by C. K. Scott Moncrieff seems timely–thanks, Boston Review and Leland de la Durantaye. We’ve just picked up Anne Carson’s New Directions pamphlet The Albertine Workout, so Proust is on the poet-mind. And it’s nice to see the focus on translation here. “[I]t was thanks [...]