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Posts Tagged ‘Frank Sherlock’

Philadelphia’s Second Poet Laureate is…. FRANK SHERLOCK! January 31, 2014: Woohoo! Yay! Congratulations Frank Sherlock! Via Philly.com-- At a City Hall ceremony Friday, Mayor Nutter will announce the appointment of Frank Sherlock, 44, as the second poet laureate of Philadelphia. Sherlock succeeds Sonia Sanchez. He will serve for two years, during which he will receive a stipend of $5,000. Duties include [...] by

Flavorwire’s Guerrilla Poetry Brigade July 9, 2013: Here's a great one, courtesy of Flavorwire: "10 Guerrilla Poetry Projects." Let's first take a look at Emily P. Lawsin's project, a spoken word performance honoring murdered Chinese-American Vincent Chin. (She's the power-house who we pictured above.) University of Michigan professor Emily P. Lawsin, specializing in Asian/Pacific [...] by

Experience Unlimited at the East Bay Poetry Summit June 17, 2013: I told lots of people that I was going to write about the East Bay Poetry Summit for Harriet’s "Open Door" series. And each time, I followed it up with a confession: “It was so wonderful, I have no idea how to write about it. Everyone will just think I drank the Kool-Aid!” I hoped that with enough time, I’d get some critical distance [...] by

Fuck Death Revisited April 2, 2010: The following (posted below) is from an essay I have been working on since last fall. The essay attempts to think about CA Conrad's poetics in relation to biopolitics and radical conceptions of the 'the body'/somatic practices as potential sites for a universal subject. It also is, unabashedly, in tribute to Conrad, who many of us can't help [...] by

CA Conrad’s and Frank Sherlock’s The City Real and Imagined February 5, 2010: Sunday of this past weekend saw the official New York City launch of CA Conrad’s and Frank Sherlock’s collaborative book-length poem The City Real and Imagined, published by Heretical Texts, at the Zinc Bar reading series hosted by Dorothea Lasky. Among a crowd of friends and admirers the two poets read their book in its entirety, calling [...] by