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Posts Tagged ‘Paisley Rekdal’

New to the Archive July 2, 2013: It's been some time since we checked in with what's new in our archive, so we thought we'd pull out a few file-folders and see what's been added. We'll start with poems we've included by some Harriet contributors. First, we have poems from Paisley Rekdal's latest book Animal Eye. Among other things, we learn why some girls love horses. We [...] by

Paisley Rekdal on Biracialism and Poetry June 19, 2013: At Boston Review, Paisley Rekdal contributes this powerful write-up on biracialism and poetry. It's a very-worthy, lengthy and thought-provoking read! Rekdal writes: This is the reason why, when approached by students or anthologists to present work publicly that I deem representative of my biracial status, I hesitate. Because for [...] by

Scandal Erupts Over Plagiarism!! May 22, 2013: Poets! What's going on here?!?! We've caught wind of yet ANOTHER plagiarism scandal, reported by the Guardian. Last month Paisley Rekdal shared her thoughts on being plagiarized by Christian Ward here. This time, it looks like another British poet has been lifting lines (nay, entire poems!) from numerous poets in the U.S. The deets: The [...] by

On Depression, Poets, & Candy April 10, 2013: In high school a friend of mine, who was suffering through the relentlessly miserable alienation of a suburban public education, was diagnosed with “Emotional Disorder.” Emotional Disorder! She is, no surprise, a poet and artist. Don’t all poets suffer from Emotional Disorder? Paisley Rekdal so wittily describes the difficulties of [...] by

Paisley Rekdal’s Animal Eye Reviewed at The Rumpus March 20, 2013: We were happy to see that Paisley Rekdal was awarded the University of North Texas’s Rilke Prize earlier this month. And we're excited to see folks are talking about her new collection Animal Eye. Trista Edwards offers some thoughts on the volume over at The Rumpus, writing: There is, indeed, a presence extremely primal about this [...] by

Paisley Rekdal Awarded UNT’s Rilke Prize February 26, 2013: We are thrilled to see that Paisley Rekdal has been awarded the University of North Texas’s Rilke Prize. Jerome Weeks reports from the Art and Seek blog: The $10,000 award was established two years ago to recognize outstanding mid-career poets. Paisley Rekdal won it for her fourth book of poems, Animal Eye. Rekdal teaches at the [...] by

Talking With Paisley Rekdal About Animal Eye and Natural Change August 30, 2012: At BOMBLOG! Levi Rubeck talks with poet Paisley Rekdal "about the role of the pastoral and her approach to humanity’s uglier facets [in] her book, Animal Eye." Rubeck studied with Rekdal at The University of Wyoming, where his "notions of tradition were challenged and [his] personal relationship with verse was reaffirmed." Here's an excerpt [...] by

Paisley Rekdal on the Poetry of Archery July 31, 2012: The 2012 Summer Olympics are upon us and poetry is playing quite the role this year, as we reported last week. Well, let's keep it rolling. Here is Paisley Rekdal's meditation on archery, via LARB. She writes: If I wax poetic or sentimental in my descriptions of archery, it is because I think there’s poetry in the sport. [...] by

NPR’s Morning Edition and LARB Celebrate the Olympics with Poetry July 27, 2012: Happily, the Poetry Parnassus seems to have inspired a wellspring of poetic events. First, NPR's Morning Edition is hosting a poetry competition every morning next week, somewhat in the style of the original Olympics in ancient Greece: From the far reaches of the globe, we've invited poets to compose original works celebrating [...] by

The NPR NewsPoet Strikes Again! July 11, 2012: Each month, NPR chooses a poet to write the day's news cycle in verse. This time, they chose Paisley Rekdal, who wasn't necessarily inspired by the same stories the news staff chose to feature. Instead, her attention veered to a list on the whiteboard that had little to do with current events, but rather the departure of a man named Rick. In [...] by