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Posts Tagged ‘Tracy K. Smith’

Poets Gather to Remember Seamus Heaney November 13, 2013: The New York Times reports on the ongoing remembrances and events celebrating Seamus Heaney, who died in August at the age of 74. When Seamus Heaney died in August, at 74, he was hailed as a poet of unusual grace and humility, an ambassador for poetry whose reach stretched far beyond the rural Ireland of his most famous verse. And [...] by

Weekends with Tracy K. Smith January 28, 2013: It's Monday. We at Harriet are reassembling our collective consciousness and getting on with the work week. In this New York Times article that walks through a typical weekend with Tracy K. Smith and her family, we've been reminded how utterly sweet that two-day stretch can be in. Ever wonder what a Pulitzer Prize winning poet has for a [...] by

Tracy K. Smith in conversation at Ploughshares May 30, 2012: Surf over to Ploughshares to check out a great conversation between Tracy K. Smith and Michael Klein. They cover a lot of ground, so to get you started, a taste: MK: Of course, what I love about Life On Mars is how otherworldly it is and yet how direct it is, too, about life on earth. You make the universe as intimate as love for a [...] by

Discussion with Camille Rankine, Patrick Rosal, and Tracy K. Smith May 16, 2012: James Tolan's post at the Ploughshares blog covers Cave Canem's panel with poets Tracy K. Smith and Patrick Rosal, moderated by poet Camille Rankine. The discussion, as Tolan's title states, ranged from poetry to Hip Hop to Academia. Here's a taste. Jump on over for the rest. Poet Camille Rankine moderated Smith and Rosal’s talk on [...] by

The Dark Room Collective reunites May 3, 2012: The Washingtonian covers the most anticipated poetry reunion of the year, that of The Dark Room Collective. Abdul Ali reports that the group collectively rocked the house at a recent reading at the Folger Library: The evening felt more like a church service or a rock concert than a poetry reading. Pews were filled to capacity as each [...] by