The Boston Evening Transcript

By T. S. Eliot 1888–1965
The readers of the Boston Evening Transcript
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn.

When evening quickens faintly in the street,
Wakening the appetites of life in some
And to others bringing the Boston Evening Transcript,
I mount the steps and ring the bell, turning
Wearily, as one would turn to nod good-bye to Rochefoucauld,
If the street were time and he at the end of the street,
And I say, "Cousin Harriet, here is the Boston Evening Transcript."

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Poet T. S. Eliot 1888–1965

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries, Class

 T. S. Eliot

Biography

When T. S. Eliot died, wrote Robert Giroux, "the world became a lesser place." Certainly the most imposing poet of his time, Eliot was revered by Igor Stravinsky "not only as a great sorcerer of words but as the very key keeper of the language." For Alfred Kazin he was "the mana known as 'T. S. Eliot,' the model poet of our time, the most cited poet and incarnation of literary correctness in the English-speaking world." Northrop . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Cities & Urban Life, Social Commentaries, Class

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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