Fire and Ice

By Robert Frost 1874–1963 Robert Frost
Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.

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Poet Robert Frost 1874–1963

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Religion, Nature, Arts & Sciences, Humor & Satire, Philosophy, Sciences

Poetic Terms Epigram

 Robert  Frost

Biography

Robert Frost holds a unique and almost isolated position in American letters. "Though his career fully spans the modern period and though it is impossible to speak of him as anything other than a modern poet," writes James M. Cox, "it is difficult to place him in the main tradition of modern poetry." In a sense, Frost stands at the crossroads of nineteenth-century American poetry and modernism, for in his verse may be found the . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Religion, Nature, Arts & Sciences, Humor & Satire, Philosophy, Sciences

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Poetic Terms Epigram

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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