Song After Campion

By Robert Fitzgerald 1910–1985 Robert Fitzgerald
Ravished lute, sing to her virgin ears,   
Soft notes thy strings repeating;
Plucked harp, whose amorous song she hears,   
Tell her the time is fleeting;
Night-tide and my distress of love
O speak, sweet numbers,
That pity her heart may move
Before she slumbers.

Pale moth, that from the moon doth fly,   
Fickle enchantments weaving,
Night faery, come my lady nigh
When the rich masques are leaving;   
Tell her who lieth still alone
Love is a treasure
Fair as the frail lute’s tone
And perished measure.

Robert Fitzgerald, “Song after Campion” from Spring Shade: Poems 1931-1970. Copyright © 1969 by Robert Fitzgerald. Used by the permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.

Source: Spring Shade: Poems 1931-1970 (New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1971)

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Poet Robert Fitzgerald 1910–1985

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Time & Brevity, Relationships, Living, Love, Men & Women, Desire, Infatuation & Crushes

Holidays Valentine's Day

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Robert  Fitzgerald

Biography

Robert Fitzgerald (1910 - 1985) was born in Springfield, Illinois, and attended Harvard University, where he received an excellent education in the classics. After college, he started to translate Greek poetry to keep up his skills. They were published and soon earned him the reputation as one of the best Greek translators in English. Though more known for his translations, Fitzgerald is also a poet in his own right. In poems . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Time & Brevity, Relationships, Living, Love, Men & Women, Desire, Infatuation & Crushes

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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