The White Island, or Place of the Blest

By Robert Herrick 1591–1674 Robert Herrick
      In this world, the isle of dreams,
      While we sit by sorrow’s streams,
      Tears and terrors are our themes

      But when once from hence we fly,
      More and more approaching nigh
             Unto young eternity,

       In that whiter island, where
       Things are evermore sincere;
       Candor here and luster there

    There no monstrous fancies shall
       Out of hell an horror call,
       To create, or cause at all,

    There, in calm and cooling sleep
      We our eyes shall never steep,
       But eternal watch shall keep,

    Pleasures, such as shall pursue
         Me immortalized, and you;
        And fresh joys, as never too
                  Have ending.

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Poet Robert Herrick 1591–1674


Subjects Living, Religion

Poetic Terms Metaphor, Rhymed Stanza

 Robert  Herrick


Almost forgotten in the eighteenth century, and in the nineteenth century alternately applauded for his poetry’s lyricism and condemned for its “obscenities,” Robert Herrick is, in the latter half of the twentieth century, finally becoming recognized as one of the most accomplished nondramatic poets of his age. Long dismissed as merely a “minor poet” and, as a consequence, neglected or underestimated by scholars and critics, the . . .

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SUBJECT Living, Religion


Poetic Terms Metaphor, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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