No summer as yet

By Laurie Sheck Laurie Sheck
And no summer as yet, but it will come with its bright pieces of whatever,
    Sorted by the eye yet still uncaptured,
Greenly branched and various with promise. I'd like to watch it long enough,
    Held fast by the laws of its sequencings and shapings, and be so carried, the way the mind goes in
Search of an after that will temper what has come before,

Or sometimes not—: Did I tell you of the man I visited last week, who hasn't lost the ability
    To move his tongue, his lips, to laugh or cry or sing or use his voice, yet is unable
To utter any words, just a few unintelligible syllables,
    And recognizing this, stares into the fact of it
As at the eggs in an opened anthill? I don't know how to think of him. We are so rawly made,
    So carried into the harsh and almost-dark.

As if stung in the throat. As if seared by a narrow wire-like blaze
    Sharply upon the air and always.

Laurie Sheck, "No summer as yet" from Captivity. Copyright © 2007 by Laurie Sheck.  Reprinted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.

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Poet Laurie Sheck

Subjects Living, Health & Illness, Nature, Summer, The Body

Poetic Terms Free Verse

 Laurie  Sheck

Biography

Born and raised in the Bronx, poet Laurie Sheck was educated at the University of Iowa. She has published several collections of poetry, including Captivity (2007); The Willow Grove (1996), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; and Amaranth (1981). Her poems often use myths as frames within which to explore ideas of motion and stillness, consciousness and the body. In a 2002 interview, speaking to the attentiveness, rather than . . .

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Poems by Laurie Sheck

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Health & Illness, Nature, Summer, The Body

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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