Spring Snow

By William Matthews 1942–1997 William Matthews
Here comes the powdered milk I drank
as a child, and the money it saved.
Here come the papers I delivered,
the spotted dog in heat that followed me home

and the dogs that followed her.
Here comes a load of white laundry
from basketball practice, and sheets
with their watermarks of semen.

And here comes snow, a language
in which no word is ever repeated,
love is impossible, and remorse. . . .
Yet childhood doesn’t end,

but accumulates, each memory
knit to the next, and the fields
become one field. If to die is to lose
all detail, then death is not

so distinguished, but a profusion
of detail, a last gossip, character
passed wholly into fate and fate
in flecks, like dust, like flour, like snow.

William Matthews, “Spring Snow” from Rising and Falling. Copyright © 1979 by William Matthews. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Source: Rising and Falling (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1979)

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Poet William Matthews 1942–1997

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

Subjects Living, Death, Time & Brevity, Nature, Spring, Weather

 William  Matthews

Biography

William Matthews's poetry has earned him a reputation as a master of well-turned phrases, wise sayings, and rich metaphors. Much of Matthews's poetry explores the themes of life cycles, the passage of time, and the nature of human consciousness. In another type of poem, he focuses on his particular enthusiasms: jazz music, basketball, and his children. His early writing was free-form and epigrammatic. As his career has . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Death, Time & Brevity, Nature, Spring, Weather

POET’S REGION U.S., Midwestern

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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