Grieve Not

By Walter Clyde Curry 1887–1967
Grieve not that winter masks the yet quick earth,
        Nor still that summer walks the hills no more;
        That fickle spring has doffed the plaid she wore
To swathe herself in napkins till rebirth.

These buddings, flowerings, are nothing worth;
        This ermine cloud stretched firm across the lakes
        Will presently be shattered into flakes;
Then, starveling world, be subject to my mirth.

I know that faithful swift mortality
        Subscribes to nothing longer than a day;
        All beauty signals imminent decay;
And painted wreckage cumbers land and sea.

I laugh to hear a sniveling wise one say,
“Some winnowed self escapes this reckless way.”

from The Fugitive, 1922

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Poet Walter Clyde Curry 1887–1967

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

SCHOOL / PERIOD Fugitive

Subjects Living, Time & Brevity, Nature, Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall

Poetic Terms Sonnet

Biography

Born in Graycourt, South Carolina, poet and medieval scholar Walter Clyde Curry earned a BA at Wofford College and an MA and PhD at Stanford University. He was a founding member of the Fugitives, an influential literary group that first met around 1915 at Vanderbilt University. The group, which included poets Robert Penn Warren, Donald Davidson, and Allen Tate, has been seen as a predecessor to the New Criticism movement. They . . .

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Poems by Walter Clyde Curry

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Time & Brevity, Nature, Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

SCHOOL / PERIOD Fugitive

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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