Agony in the Garden

By Peg Boyers b. 1952 Peg Boyers
At supper he whispers something in your ear,
the Judas boy, who wants you.
 
We go to the garden where it’s cool
and wait.
 
From my place against the tree
I see you through the window,
 
watch as you walk from door to desk,
reach into your pocket,
 
pull out your wallet, empty it and leave it by the lamp,
pick up a pen, lean over to write, then don’t,
 
take something heavy from the drawer, put it back
then sweep the money into a paper bag.
 
You walk from desk to door and out, your hand
reaching back to put out the light.
 
On the security film you leave the building
alone, holding the heavy bag.
 
Off camera you walk towards the Charles, leave
your saddle shoes under the pedestrian bridge.
 
We wait in the garden.
And wait.
 
We don’t know yet whom you meet or why.
We don’t know yet that the river has claimed you.

Peg Boyers, "Agony in the Garden" from Honey with Tobacco. Copyright © 2007 by Peg Boyers.  Reprinted by permission of The University of Chicago Press.

Source: Honey with Tobacco (The University of Chicago Press, 2007)

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Poet Peg Boyers b. 1952

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

Subjects Living, Sorrow & Grieving, Love, Heartache & Loss, Relationships, Friends & Enemies

Poetic Terms Allusion

 Peg  Boyers

Biography

Poet Peg Boyers was born in San Tomé, Venezuela, but spent her childhood on the move, living in such countries as Libya, Italy, Indonesia, and Cuba. She earned her BA from Skidmore College. Her collections of poetry are Hard Bread (2002) and Honey with Tobacco (2007). Hard Bread contains a series of poems written in the voice of Natalia Ginzburg (1916–1991), an Italian writer, editor, and mother who witnessed World War II. . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Sorrow & Grieving, Love, Heartache & Loss, Relationships, Friends & Enemies

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

Poetic Terms Allusion

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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