Ararat

By Mark Doty b. 1953 Mark Doty
Wrapped in gold foil, in the search
and shouting of Easter Sunday,
it was the ball of the princess,
it was Pharoah’s body
sleeping in its golden case.
At the foot of the picket fence,
in grass lank with the morning rain,
it was a Sunday school prize,
silver for second place, gold
for the triumphant little dome
of Ararat, and my sister
took me by the hand and led me
out onto the wide, wet lawn
and showed me to bend into the thick nests
of grass, into the darkest green.
Later I had to give it back,
in exchange for a prize,
though I would rather have kept the egg.
What might have coiled inside it?
Crocuses tight on their clock-springs,
a bird who’d sing himself into an angel
in the highest reaches of the garden,
the morning’s flaming arrow?
Any small thing can save you.
Because the golden egg gleamed
in my basket once, though my childhood
became an immense sheet of darkening water
I was Noah, and I was his ark,
and there were two of every animal inside me.

Mark Doty, "Ararat" from Bethlehem in Broad Daylight. Copyright © 1991 by Mark Doty. Reprinted by permission of David R. Godine, Publisher, Inc.



Source: Bethlehem in Broad Daylight (David R. Godine, 1991)

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Poet Mark Doty b. 1953

Subjects Living, Coming of Age, Youth, Religion, Christianity

 Mark  Doty

Biography

Since the publication of his first volume of verse, Turtle, Swan, in 1987, Mark Doty has been recognized as one of the most accomplished poets in America. Hailed for his elegant, intelligent verse, Doty has often been compared to James Merrill, Walt Whitman and C.P. Cavafy. His syntactically complex and aesthetically profound free verse poems, odes to urban gay life, and quietly brutal elegies to his lover, Wally Roberts, have . . .

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SUBJECT Living, Coming of Age, Youth, Religion, Christianity

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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