We grow accustomed to the Dark - (428)

By Emily Dickinson 1830–1886 Emily Dickinson
We grow accustomed to the Dark - 
When Light is put away -
As when the Neighbor holds the Lamp
To witness her Good bye -
 
A Moment - We uncertain step
For newness of the night -
Then - fit our Vision to the Dark - 
And meet the Road  - erect - 
 
And so of larger - Darknesses -
Those Evenings of the Brain -
When not a Moon disclose a sign -
Or Star - come out - within -
 
The Bravest - grope a little -
And sometimes hit a Tree
Directly in the Forehead -
But as they learn to see -
 
Either the Darkness alters -
Or something in the sight
Adjusts itself to Midnight -
And Life steps almost straight.

Source: The Poems of Emily Dickinson: Reading Edition, edited by R.W. Franklin (Harvard University Press, 1999)

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Poet Emily Dickinson 1830–1886

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Living, Life Choices, The Mind, Activities, Sports & Outdoor Activities, Nature

Poetic Terms Common Measure, Metaphor, Rhymed Stanza

 Emily  Dickinson

Biography

A poet who took definition as her province, Emily Dickinson challenged the existing definitions of poetry and the poet’s work. Like writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman, she experimented with expression in order to free it from conventional restraints. Like writers such as Charlotte Brontë and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, she crafted a new type of persona for the first person. The speakers in . . .

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Poems by Emily Dickinson

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Life Choices, The Mind, Activities, Sports & Outdoor Activities, Nature

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Poetic Terms Common Measure, Metaphor, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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