Cock-Crow

By Edward Thomas 1878–1917 Edward Thomas
Out of the wood of thoughts that grows by night
To be cut down by the sharp axe of light,—
Out of the night, two cocks together crow,
Cleaving the darkness with a silver blow:
And bright before my eyes twin trumpeters stand,
Heralds of splendour, one at either hand,
Each facing each as in a coat of arms:
The milkers lace their boots up at the farms.

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Poet Edward Thomas 1878–1917

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Activities, Gardening, Nature, Animals, Landscapes & Pastorals, Social Commentaries, War & Conflict

Poetic Terms Couplet

 Edward  Thomas

Biography

Such prominent critics and authors as Walter de la Mare, Aldous Huxley, Peter SacksSeamus Heaney, and Edna Longley have called Edward Thomas one of England's most important poets. Since 2000, much serious consideration has been given to Thomas's work. Most critics would agree with Andrew Motion, who states that Thomas occupies "a crucial place in the development of twentieth-century poetry" for introducing a modern . . .

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SUBJECT Activities, Gardening, Nature, Animals, Landscapes & Pastorals, Social Commentaries, War & Conflict

POET’S REGION England

Poetic Terms Couplet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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