Letter from Poetry Magazine

Letter to the Editor

by Marilyn Chin
Marilyn Chin responds:

The first two characters in the quatrain are onomatopoeic, mimicking the sound of a woman's crying. Therefore, "boo-hoo" is an accurate translation, both semantically and tonally. I was aiming to capture the edgy, satirical attitude so ample in Ho's work.

Perhaps Joseph Bednarik is not conscious that "noodling around in the margins" is an appalling and problematic expression, fraught with demeaning sexist, racist, imperialist overtones, and born out of the very hateful stuff that Ho Xuan Huong so pointedly and whole-heartedly fought against in her poetry and in her life. All ugliness revealed, perhaps we could finally cut through his pernicious smugness and have that real discussion regarding how many Western cultural imperialists does it take to plunder Wang Wei and who, if anyone, should have the rightful claim to an Asian woman's poetry. "Noodling" could have been an unfortunate slip and not unconscious hatred; but he might as well have said "flied-licing." Perhaps Bednarik and his press believe that the white male patriarchy must forever colonize the translation of Asian poetry and that I, a dark-skinned Asian woman poet, should not be "noodling" where I don't belong.
Originally Published: May 16, 2008

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Biography

Poet Marilyn Chin was born in Hong Kong but grew up in Oregon, in the U.S. Northwest. A noted anthologist, translator and educator as well as a poet and novelist, Chin’s work distills her experiences both as an Asian American and as a politically attuned woman. Her poetry is noted for its direct and often confrontational attitude. “The pains of cultural assimilation infuse her…poems,” wrote Contemporary Women Poets essayist . . .

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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