Clock

By Pierre Reverdy 1889–1960 Pierre Reverdy

Translated By Lydia Davis

    In the warm air of the ceiling the footlights of dreams are illuminated.
       The white walls have curved. The burdened chest breathes confused words. In the mirror, the wind from the south spins, 
carrying leaves and feathers. The window is blocked. The heart is 
almost extinguished among the already cold ashes of the moon — the hands are without shelter ­­­­— as all the trees lying down. In the wind from the desert the needles bend and my hour is past.

Source: Poetry (October 2013).

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This poem originally appeared in the October 2013 issue of Poetry magazine

October 2013

Biography

Reverdy began his career as a poet when he moved to Paris in 1910. His supporting father died a year later, so the aspiring poet was forced to eke out a living through his writing. He published his first small volume of poetry in 1915 and continued to write steadily thereafter. Gradually Reverdy became known in literary circles, frequenting the avant-garde group consisting of such wellknown artists and writers as Guillaume . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Death, Health & Illness, The Body, Time & Brevity

POET’S REGION France

Poetic Terms Prose Poem

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