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Cy Twombly: Painter & Poet

Poetry News

At Paris Review, Mary Jacobus presents pages from her book Reading Cy Twombly: Poetry in Paint to demonstrate how poetry inspired Twombly’s painterly work. These images, selected from my book Reading Cy Twombly: Poetry in Paint, indicate the range and provocation of Cy Twombly’s works on canvas and paper, pointing especially to his inventive use […]

Cecilia Corrigan’s Misconceptions About Hillary Clinton Dramatized in New Video Series

Poetry News

Poet, writer, and performance artist Cecilia Corrigan brings a fun one to BOMB. Starting this past weekend is the first installment of Motherland, Corrigan’s new video project, to be released in a serialized format by BOMB over the next few weeks, “in a shadow narrative of the upcoming election.” “Then, after the results are in, […]

Mary Austin Speaker Reviews Danez Smith’s <em>Black Movie</em>

Poetry News

Poet and book designer Mary Austin Speaker reviews Danez Smith’s Black Movie (Button Poetry) for Rain Taxi. The collection is described by Speaker as “a cinematic tour-de-force that lets poetry vie with film for the honor of which medium can most effectively articulate the experience of Black America.” More: Smith’s filmic catalog begins with a […]

On Philip Larkin’s Photographs

Poetry News

In the Threepenny Review, Tomas Unger reconsiders Philip Larkin’s photographs, which—like his poetry—exhibits a “a knowledge newly felt, founded on real seeing.” More: At least twice in his life—once in a passing remark and once in a perfect line—Philip Larkin, who played at being merely dour, used the word lovely. It doesn’t seem to be […]

Carl Van Vechten Receives His Due in Smithsonian Portrait Exhibition

Poetry News

Alex Palmer reports on the rare opportunity to see a selection of Robert Van Vechten’s images at the Smithsonian this month. Thirty-nine photographs are on view in the museum’s “Heroes of Harlem: Photographs by Carl Van Vechten” for the first time since they were acquired in 1983, says Palmer. From Smithsonian Mag: “Carl Van Vechten […]

University of Arizona Poetry Center Publishes <em>Citizen</em> Teaching Guide

Poetry News

Suzi F. Garcia’s essay about teaching Claudia Rankine’s Citizen to non-poetry students highlights the need for complex discussion about race in academia, as well as students’s and teachers’s responses. I often joke in teaching panels that the only thing students are more scared of than science or math is poetry. D.A. Powell once told me […]

The Machinations of Translation

Featured Blogger

“Something that would definitively wipe out memory, maybe.” Juan Carlos Flores (1962-2016), “Machi-nation,” as translated by Kristin Dykstra I had been planning a post about recent Latin American poetry in translation, when I heard the awful news Wednesday morning about the passing of Cuban poet Juan Carlos Flores. I had wanted to write in detail […]

<em>The Guardian</em> Reviews Don Paterson’s <em>Landing Light</em>

Poetry News

At the Guardian, Sarah Crown hails Landing Light by Don Paterson as a book that will give you hope. “[P]oetry, it seems to me, shucks off temporality and steps into a world of pure potential, where even death has no dominion,” writes Crown. More: Don Paterson’s third poetry collection, Landing Light, came out in 2003 […]

‘Not So Fast, OED,’ Says Shakespeare Scholar

Poetry News

According to a new article by University of Melbourne lecturer Dr. David McInnis, published for the university, the Oxford English Dictionary may have falsely credited William Shakespeare as the creator of a number of English phrases ranging from “it’s all Greek to me” and a “wild goose chase.” More: Shakespeare did not coin phrases such […]

Hoa Nguyen’s Expert <em>Violet Energy Ingots</em>

Poetry News

Hoa Nguyen’s latest book, Violet Energy Ingots (Wave) is reviewed by Ryo Yamaguchi for Boston Review. While Yamaguchi does attach the well-trod sense of “difficulty” to the poems here, she doesn’t hesitate to read closely, and considers many of Nguyen’s varying techniques. Together, interestingly, they “evidence a professionalism that is itself assimilated into Nguyen’s concerns.” […]

Elizabeth Alexander on the Power of the People at <em>Washington Post</em>

Poetry News

Washington Post celebrates museums in the latest issue of its magazine. Up on WP’s website, check out Elizabeth Alexander’s affirming essay on “the power of a people’s voice.” We — and this “we” means all Americans — have long needed a place where we can come and come again to learn our history through our […]

Tracing Monica Youn’s Poetic Fascination With Etymology

Poetry News

Graywolf shares a Monica Youn essay on why the roots of language matter, to celebrate the publication of her new book of poems, Blackacre. “First coined in 1628, the term ‘blackacre’ is a legal fiction, a hypothetical estate. It is also a password among lawyers marking one’s initiation into a centuries-old tradition of legal indoctrination,” […]

<em>Washington Post</em> Reveals Olds, Youn, and Merwin’s Mastery

Poetry News

Washington Post’s Elizabeth Lund reviews new books by recent award winners and long-listers Sharon Olds, Monica Youn, and W.S. Merwin. Lund starts out with Sharon Olds’s Odes which, she writes, “demonstrates the candor and clarity that have defined her work over the past four decades.” More: Odes, by Sharon Olds (Knopf), demonstrates the candor and […]

At <em>Paris Review:</em> Anthony Madrid on Reviving Meter

Poetry News

Don’t knock it ’til you’ve tried it! In the Paris Review’s daily installment, Anthony Madrid coaxes readers toward the satisfying and most beneficial effects of the otherwise rather unpopular poetic meter. It can seem, to those of us who teach poetry writing, that the only way to sell young poets on metrical effects is by […]

At <em>Triple Canopy</em>, Abraham Adams Edits the <em>New Yorker</em>

Poetry News

Published just yesterday is an essay at Triple Canopy by Abraham Adams about “New Yorker poetry,” which isn’t to say Adams writes only of poetry in the New Yorker. The piece travels through and around, and finally into the material. There’s the New Yorker’s history: The year of the New Yorker’s founding, 1925, was also […]

Jocelyn Saidenberg Discloses the Hours at <em>Open Space</em>

Poetry News

At Open Space, Jocelyn Saidenberg’s piece “Notebooks on Notebooks” opens with Denise Riley, moves to Lucretius, travels with Bob Gluck to the Horologium mirabile Lundense (a 14th-century astronomical clock in Lund, Sweden), ponders the speech of stones, translates Catullus, and more. An excerpt from this travelogue: This post, whether marking passage or embrace, is part […]

Ben Fama Meets Up With Precious Okoyomon in <em>Queen Mob’s Tea House</em>

Poetry News

After reading Precious Okoyomon’s new book of poems published by Bottlecap Press, Ajebota, author and Wonder co-founder Ben Fama spoke with Okoyomon about the meaning behind the word “Ajebota,” life between Lagos and London, and mutual friend, the writer Dana Ward. Precious Okoyomon’s writing is like local honey I see being sold at the rest […]

National Book Awards Longlist for Poetry Announced

Poetry News

Today, the New Yorker takes a look at the longlist in the poetry category for the National Book Awards. The list is a mix of established poets and emerging poets, with Donika Kelly and Solmaz Sharif’s first books appearing in 2016. Now for that list: Daniel Borzutzky, The Performance of Becoming Human (Brooklyn Arts Press) […]

This Must Be the Place: Robbie Wood on Oceania, Aboriginal Poetry, & More at <em>Jacket2</em>

Poetry News

In his Jacket2 article “From Oceania with Love, Robbie Wood considers Australian Aboriginal poetry within modernism and postmodernism’s frameworks: Although we can debate the historicization of literary modernism, particularly by attending to its formal rather than authorial delineations, it is less contestable to suggest that it had a prominent position in the cultural life of […]

Diasporican Poets Mixtape: Side Two

Featured Blogger

In my last post, I commented on five poems by diasporic Puerto Rican poets published in 2015. Here, for side two of my mixtape, I will comment on some Diasporican poems published during the first eight months of 2016.  Thank you for sticking with this overextended remix! 06. Martín Espada, “El Moriviví.” In Vivas to […]