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‘The beetle runs into the future’

Featured Blogger

It’s been a terrible year, so I’m going to spend the last day of it by just writing about a few things that brought me joy, and challenged how I think, in the hope that they do the same for someone who reads this. I’ve never told anyone about R.F. Langley who hasn’t been grateful […]

‘Out of Many, One’: Karen Swallow Prior on Walt Whitman’s View of America

Poetry News

At The Atlantic, Karen Swallow Prior reads Walt Whitman with a view of America post-election. She writes “Notably, Whitman’s grammar (‘the United States are’) signals his understanding of the country as a plural noun—not one uniform body, but a union of disparate parts.” More: Whitman was centrally concerned with the American experiment in democracy and […]

Raúl Zurita: First Artist Selected for the Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Poetry News

Live Mint profiles Chilean poet, visual artist, and activist Raúl Zurita on the occasion of India’s Kochi-Muziris Biennale (on view until March 29). For the biennale, Zurita made The Sea Of Pain. “It’s the highlight of the three-month-long Kochi-Muziris Biennale, which is exhibiting the work of 97 artists from 31 countries” writes Riddhi Doshi. More […]

Revisiting, Rereading, & Returning to Pablo Neruda

Poetry News

For Boston Review, Magdalena Edwards reviews Then Come Back: The Lost Neruda Poems (Copper Canyon, 2016), by Pablo Neruda, translated by Forrest Gander (you’ll recall we recently mentioned an interview with Gander about the translations). Born with the name Ricardo Eliécer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto, “Neruda explains in his 1971 Paris Review interview that he took […]

The Tyrant Is Us: An Interview With Alice Notley

Poetry News

Alice Notley is interviewed at Los Angeles Review of Books. The poet, who lives in Paris, spoke with Shoshana Olidort on the morning of the second night of Notley’s reading of the entirety of the book-length poem, The Descent of Alette, at The Lab in San Francisco. “Can you tell me a bit about how […]

Jim Jarmusch Discusses <em>Paterson</em> at NPR

Poetry News

Jim Jarmusch’s new movie, Paterson pays tribute to two of the director’s favorite subjects: poetry and cities. Jarmusch’s Paterson is based on the epic poem by William Carlos Williams. The film travels through Paterson, New Jersey led by a bus driver, also named Paterson, played by Adam Driver. At All Things Considered, Joel Rose dissects […]

Elizabeth Alexander: A Total Small-Scale Warrior

Poetry News

At Lenny Letter, an interview with poet and essayist Elizabeth Alexander about her new memoir, The Light of the World (Grand Central Publishing). “I did struggle to complete the book,” says Kimberly Drew. “I’d read twenty or so pages and would cry on and off for a few days. In fact, before I could properly […]

A Baker’s Dozen of Prose from <em>Poetry<em>

From Poetry Magazine

As the door closes on 2016, we find ourselves revisiting the many prose pieces we published this past year. Maybe you missed a one of these the first time around, or maybe you want to return to a few of the questions our contributors raised over the past twelve months. Here, in no particular order, are some of the top prose […]

Brandon Shimoda on Oregon’s Memorial to Japanese Internment

Poetry News

We can’t let this one pass us by: Earlier this month, poet Brandon Shimoda reflected on downtown Portland’s Japanese American Historical Plaza, built to commemorate the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, for the New Inquiry. An excerpt: THE plaza does not require that anyone remember. It is a suggestion, but the process […]

Poetic Journalism With Stacy Szymaszek

Poetry News

While we were snoozing, over at the Rumpus Brandi Homan was hitting the beat and getting the story on Stacy Szymaszek’s latest book from Fence, Journal of Ugly Sites & Other Journals. Their conversation dives into JOUS and looks at the book from many angles, from the book’s genesis to its place in Szymaszek’s oeuvre. […]

‘I Wanted to be a Diminutive, Profuse, Electric Ribbon of Horniness and Divine Grace’: Maggie Nelson on Prince, at <em>The New Yorker</em>

Poetry News

Poet Maggie Nelson recounts her first encounter with Prince. The pop star, who died this year, was an early inspiration. Nelson writes: “Was I sexual at ten? I don’t know. I know my father died, and then, suddenly, there was Prince.” More: 1984 was also the year of “Purple Rain.” We saw it in the […]

Marlene Dietrich’s ‘Night Thoughts’ Accessioned at <em>The New Yorker</em>

Poetry News

When the actress Marlene Dietrich passed away, Peter and Maria Riva (her children) donated a fraction of her library to the Film Museum in Berlin and the American Library in Paris. But what did she read and do in her final days, spent mostly in isolation? In addition to racking up a three-thousand-dollar-a-month phone bill, […]

<em>Washington Post’s</em> Best of the Rest

Poetry News

Elizabeth Lund of the Washington Post jumps from the latest by C.K. Williams to Günter Grass in her year-end synopsis of worthy reads. Both collections tackle death as their subject matters. More: Günter Grass, too, faces end-of-life questions in his final book, Of All That Ends (Houghton Mifflin). The book brings together poems, short prose […]

<em>New Yorker</em> Posts Favorite Poetry Reads of the Year

Poetry News

As the New Yorker’s Dan Chiasson attests, this year has not been great. Who knows what the grim future holds? “These days, it’s a morning highlight when I find a sweater on the floor that already has a shirt inside it. But when we reëmerge someday from our underground silos, nurtured by Tang and protein […]

<em>TIME</em> for Jim Jarmusch…

Poetry News

Jim Jarmusch is, in particular, a fan of the New York School poets Frank O’Hara and John Ashbery. However, his newest film, Paterson, traces the development of a character modeled after William Carlos Williams, and takes place in Paterson, NJ. In an interview with TIME, Jarmusch explains: “I went on a day trip to Paterson […]

Etel Adnan, Suzanne Buffam & More Chosen for <em>New York Times’</em>s Best Poetry of 2016

Poetry News

David Orr has picked his favorite books of poetry from 2016 for the New York Times. “Here are 10 poetry collections published in 2016 that do the art form proud, even if none of their authors are likely to appear at the inauguration.” His choices throw some light on small presses, including Suzanne Buffam’s A […]

From the Bakersfield Fan Forum: Ara Shirinyan’s Longing to Be With the Lively Fishes

Poetry News

The recent Bakersfield Fan Forum, for which “poets, artists and scholars discussed the politics of fandom, appropriation and the concepts of the amateur and the enthusiast,” was “cultivated” by Poetic Research Bureau and featured readers of all stripes at Todd Madigan Gallery of California State University Bakersfield (CSUB). “Members of the forum created print-on-demand books […]

Lemony Snicket’s Poetry Prize

Poetry News

Netflix is working on the second screen adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events by Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket). With his excess per diem funds from travel, reports the Huffington Post, Handler is founding Per Diem Press, which will publish (as Handler himself announced on Facebook) “a single chapbook of poetry in early 2017, […]

Melissa Range Converses With Stephen Burt at <em>Literary Hub</em>

Poetry News

Most recently the author of Scriptorium (Beacon Press, 2016), selected by Tracy K. Smith as a winner of the 2015 National Poetry Series, Melissa Range speaks with Harvard Professor of English Stephen Burt about religious doctrine and rural identity at Literary Hub. In addition to being “interested in speaking about environmental injustice and poverty in […]

Three Small Presses That Bring More Women Into Publishing

Poetry News

Though more women read than men, “[m]embers of the literary world from various backgrounds have pointed out that book publishing elevates the work of men over women,” writes Aaron Calvin for Pacific Standard, where he looks at three small presses doing their part to level the field: Dorothy, YesYes Books, and Graywolf. “Though, behind the […]