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Clarence Major Interviewed at <em>The Rumpus</em>

Poetry News

The multi-talented Clarence Major is interviewed at The Rumpus. Major doesn’t dabble in the variety of arts he practices, but rather he is an accomplished poet, painter, and novelist all at once, or at least one at a time, as he explains to David Breithaupt: Rumpus: Many writers seem to be visual artists on the […]

Robert Fernandez on the Landscape of the Midwest, His Own Work as Unfamiliar Music, & More

Poetry News

At Midwestern Gothic, Kristina Perkins talks with poet Robert Fernandez about his third collection, Scarecrow (Wesleyan, 2016). As Perkins notes, Fernandez was born in Hartford, Connecticut, and grew up in Miami, Florida. He earned his MFA and PhD at the University of Iowa, and currently lives in Nebraska. He has an interesting take, therefore, on […]

A Cyclical Act: <em>Entropy</em> Reviews Lauren Levin’s <em>The Braid</em>

Poetry News

Lauren Levin’s new book, The Braid (Krupskaya, 2016) is reviewed at Entropy. Jake Reber takes a fragmented approach, reckoning with Levin’s moving “between, through, under spaces.” An excerpt: ii. To Quote Levin altering a Fanon quote — “a woman who possesses a language is possessed by the world expressed by this language” possession is about […]

Aaron Giovannone on Poets & Wealth at <em>The Walrus</em>

Poetry News

At Canada’s arts and culture publication, The Walrus, poet Aaron Giovannone writes about a few collections that approach the concept of wealth from the perspective of artists. From Josef Kaplan’s Kill List to the writings of Frederick Seidel, Giovannone, an adjunct instructor, mulls wealth’s impact on poetry and why the subject doesn’t appear in poetry […]

Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera Visits San Diego Students

Poetry News

Former California Poet Laureate and now our nation’s poet laureate (for a second term) Juan Felipe Herrera spoke to students at The Bishop’s School in La Jolla, California about discovering his voice while a young man at Lowell Elementary School in San Diego. “Growing up as a Mexican-American in San Diego, he said, he felt […]

Brent Cunningham on ‘Literary Infrastructure’ & the Importance of the NEA

Poetry News

Poet and Small Press Distribution (SPD) Operations Director Brent Cunningham talks with The Rumpus about “literary infrastructure” and the NEA. “While the UK, for instance, has generally deeper traditions of government funding for the arts, curiously there’s nothing quite like SPD there, and the same is true of a number of countries. When people ask […]

‘Detonations happen’: francine j. harris’s <em>play dead</em> Reviewed

Poetry News

A few weeks ago Stevie Edwards was wondering why francine j. harris’s second collection, play dead, hadn’t received more attention since it’s publication in the spring of 2016. If you, dear reader, recall, Edwards believes part of the reason for the dearth of reviews is because of the book’s difficulty and strangeness (both positive qualities […]

RIP Harry Mathews, 1930–2017

Poetry News

Le Monde has confirmed the news that poet, writer, translator, and Oulipo member Harry Mathews has died. The Paris Review Daily reports the news in English. “In Harry, the Review has lost one of its most faithful and best-loved contributors, a writer we’ve worked with for more than fifty years—beginning in 1962, when we ran […]

<em>Catch News</em> Interviews Ishion Hutchinson

Poetry News

On the eve of the Jaipur Literature Festival, India’s Catch News interviews Ishion Hutchinson, who took a break from teaching classes at Cornell to speak with the publication. “After our little talk with him, we know that those are a bunch of really lucky students,” Catch writes. More: JS: Is there a certain kind of […]

Mark Baumer Dies at 33

Poetry News

This week we’ve been reading obituaries for Mark Baumer, whose tragic death came on the 100th day of his barefoot walk across the country when he was struck by an SUV in Florida. He intended the cross-country walk to raise awareness of climate change. Baumer’s talents spanned numerous genres, as a poet, fiction writer, and […]

The Battle Over Burns

Poetry News

The Guardian reports on the U.K.’s Burns Night supper tradition, an event with verse, food, wine, kilts—all to celebrate the birth of Scotland’s literary celeb, Robert Burns. Although the annual fete is well-established, other Scottish writers have called Burns’s bluff, like Hugh MacDiarmid, who “in 1926, in his most celebrated poem, ‘A Drunk Man Looks […]

Ron Padgett’s Four Original Poems for Jim Jarmusch’s <em>Paterson</em>

Poetry News

Ron Padgett discusses the poems he composed for inclusion in Jim Jarmusch’s film Paterson, starring Adam Driver, for PBS NewsHour. They’ve also printed one of the four poems, titled “Another One.” “When Jarmusch asked Padgett, a friend, to write original poetry for the film, Padgett initially said no. But after talking it over with Jarmusch, […]

Susan Howe Awarded 2017 Frost Medal

Poetry News

The Poetry Society of America has awarded Susan Howe the Frost Medal, the organization’s highest award, presented annually for distinguished lifetime achievement in poetry. Howe is in good company, with previous Frost medalists including Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, Gwendolyn Brooks, Allen Ginsberg, Adrienne Rich, Barbara Guest, Lucille Clifton, Charles Simic, Michael S. Harper, and Marilyn […]

What’s in a Name? <em>Who Owns Primo’s</em> Reviewed

Poetry News

We certainly like reading lists. Thankfully, we have Gauss PDF Editions to roll ’em out. And at the Volta, Andy Martrich reviews Andy Sterling’s latest book, Who Owns Primo’s. To begin, Martrich needs to describe the look of the book to understand what said book is doing: Who Owns Primo’s is minimalistic. Its pages contain […]

Nice Work Dylan, but Tagore Got There First

Poetry News

We all know the first songwriter to win the Nobel was NOT Bob Dylan, right? Of course that honor went to none other than poet, artist, songwriter, performer Rabindranath Tagore. Now that we’re all on the same page, let’s leap over to Los Angeles Review of Books where Caroline Eden digs into the matter: THE […]

PEN America Crafts Toolkit for Defending Free Expression

Poetry News

PEN America guides writer-protestors to actionable items following this weekend’s historic marches, with “Defending Free Expression: A Toolkit For Writers and Readers.” Launched in keeping with Masha Gessen’s warning on November 10 (“Prepare yourself”), the toolkit seeks “to help authors, journalists, artists, and others who exercise creative expression mount a defense of their craft and […]

Chris Nealon Discusses Three of Contemporary Poetry’s Militants: Anne Boyer, Sandra Simonds, & Jasmine Gibson

Poetry News

At Lana Turner, Chris Nealon draws readers’ attention to three new collections of poetry by women who are writing from political struggles with “an effortless, vernacular awareness rich with the complex overlay of histories in the present.” These new books by Anne Boyer, Sandra Simonds, and Jasmine Gibson are equal parts wry, sharp, and honest. […]

Roger Reeves Interviewed at <em>Divedapper</em>

Poetry News

Divedapper’s Kaveh Akbar interviews Chicago-based Roger Reeves, author of King Me (Copper Canyon, 2013). Reeves has just returned from Puerto Rico, where he was covering the election. “[B]ecause this election, in some ways, is the last free election of Puerto Rico,” he says. More: …There is a way in which the book [King Me] is […]

<em>Boston Review’</em>s <em>Political and Literary Podcast</em> Released for Inauguration Day

Poetry News

Boston Review, noting the absence of poetry at the inauguration this weekend, released instead the fourth episode of A Political and Literary Podcast, featuring six American poets: Stephen Burt, Lynn Melnick, Monica Youn, Dorothea Lasky, Peter Gizzi, and Khadijah Queen, reading poems “that register protest and mark a moment of political rupture.” Also: Their work […]

Sight Unseen: Wendell Berry’s Poetry Captured in New Documentary

Poetry News

One of the stars of the Sundance Film Festival is a movie in which the protagonist is completely unseen. Environmental activist and poet Wendell Berry does not like to be on camera, yet filmmakers Laura Dunn and her husband Jef Sewell were resolute in their desire to tell Berry’s story on screen. Park Record writes: […]