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Bruce Snider

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Poet Bruce Snider grew up in rural Indiana and attended Indiana University as an undergraduate. He earned an MFA in poetry and playwriting from the University of Texas at Austin, where he was a James A. Michener Fellow. Snider’s collections, which draw on his midwestern upbringing, include The Year We Studied Women (2003), winner of the Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry, and Paradise, Indiana (2012), recipient of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Poetry Prize.

In Paradise, Indiana, Snider depicts the experience of growing up gay in a small town and frankly addresses absence and loss, acknowledging the ordinary details of rural life and complicated loves; the collection is threaded with elegiac poems for a cousin. James Crews, reviewing the book for The Rumpus, noted, “Snider is a master of the quiet moment, his memory-driven narratives slowly unfolding until the accumulation becomes a kind of redemption.”

Snider held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship in creative writing at Stanford University and was a Jenny McKean Moore Writer-in-Residence at George Washington University. He has taught at Stanford University, the University of San Francisco, and the University of Texas at Austin.  

 

Bruce Snider

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    Poet Bruce Snider grew up in rural Indiana and attended Indiana University as an undergraduate. He earned an MFA in poetry and playwriting from the University of Texas at Austin, where he was a James A. Michener Fellow. Snider’s collections, which draw on his midwestern upbringing, include The Year We Studied Women (2003), winner of the Felix Pollak Prize in Poetry, and Paradise, Indiana (2012), recipient of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Poetry Prize.
    In Paradise, Indiana, Snider depicts the experience of growing up gay in a small town and frankly addresses absence and loss, acknowledging the ordinary details of rural life and complicated loves; the collection is threaded with elegiac poems for a cousin. James Crews, reviewing the book for The Rumpus, noted, “Snider is a master of the quiet moment, his memory-driven narratives slowly unfolding until the accumulation becomes a kind of redemption.”
    Snider held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship in creative...

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