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Karyna McGlynn

Poet Details

b. 1977
Poet Karyna McGlynn grew up in Austin, Texas, and earned a BA at Seattle University and an MFA at the University of Michigan. She received a Presidential Fellowship for her doctoral studies at the University of Houston. Her debut collection, I Have to Go Back to 1994 and Kill a Girl (2009), won the Kathryn A. Morton Prize from Sarabande Books. Her work has been featured in the anthology Best American Nonrequired Reading (2010).
 
McGlynn uses psychological ephemera, pop culture, and improvisational plot to investigate danger and human longing. “Part film noir, part horror flick, these innovative poems dwell in the cul-de-sac badlands where crimes and heinous misdeeds are recurring,” noted Karla Huston in Library Journal. “McGlynn […] offers poems in alternating views while tangling reality, time, and space.” In an interview for SHARKFORUM, McGlynn noted the importance of temporality to her work: “The past is always present in my writing. […] We are not purely products of our own time—we are a decoupage of memories, both individual and shared.”
 
A member of five former National Poetry Slam teams, McGlynn has served as the organizer of the Houston Indie Book Fest and as managing editor of Gulf Coast. Founding coeditor of the poetry journal Linelinelineline, she lives in Houston.

Karyna McGlynn

Poet Details

b. 1977
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  • Biography

    Poet Karyna McGlynn grew up in Austin, Texas, and earned a BA at Seattle University and an MFA at the University of Michigan. She received a Presidential Fellowship for her doctoral studies at the University of Houston. Her debut collection, I Have to Go Back to 1994 and Kill a Girl (2009), won the Kathryn A. Morton Prize from Sarabande Books. Her work has been featured in the anthology Best American Nonrequired Reading (2010).
     
    McGlynn uses psychological ephemera, pop culture, and improvisational plot to investigate danger and human longing. “Part film noir, part horror flick, these innovative poems dwell in the cul-de-sac badlands where crimes and heinous misdeeds are recurring,” noted Karla Huston in Library Journal. “McGlynn […] offers poems in alternating views while tangling reality, time, and space.” In an interview for SHARKFORUM, McGlynn noted the importance of temporality to her work: “The past is always present in...

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