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Granite Weaving

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Granite Weaving, 1988, by Jesús Moroles




To climb, in this instance, upon a horizon

Shadow-shadow. Lip-to-lip rock.

Ziggurat. Ah, from the base to the top.

Sideways. Upwards. Again, in succession.

Sprung and sprung

Frozen idiom.

Barre. Pietrasanta. Mouth and mouth.

Sung. Granite. Stitching

The way fabric gathers — pinch, scrunch.

Not in dreams alone. Not the knot.

Step, step, step, step, step. 35 up.

As if into clouds

Ur, Aqar Quf, Chogha Zanbil, Tikal.

Kin.

Plank upon plank upon plank upon

Little Blocks: ahem. don’t you forget us.


a, of, or, but, if, la, and


Close and closer to flattened.

Rock, Water, Bone: Noisy Pilgrim.
You can read the rest of the PINTURA : PALABRA portfolio in the March 2016 issue of Poetry. All images in this portfolio are courtesy of and with permission from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Granite Weaving by Jesús Moroles, gift of Frank K. Ribelin.
Source: Poetry (March 2016)

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This poem originally appeared in the March 2016 issue of Poetry magazine

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Granite Weaving

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  • Poet, translator, teacher, playwright, librettist, and collaborative artist Valerie Martínez was born and raised in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She earned a BA from Vassar College and an MFA from the University of Arizona. Her books of poetry include Absence, Luminescent (1999), World to World (2004), And They Called It Horizon (2010), the limited-edition chapbook This is How it Began (2010), and the book-length poem, Each and Her (Camino del Sol) (2010), which won the Arizona Book Award and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN Open Book Award, the William Carlos William Award, and the Ron Ridenhour Prize. Her work has been published in journals, magazines, anthologies, and media outlets including The Best American Poetry, the Washington Post, and the Poetry Foundation’s “Poetry Everywhere” series. Martínez also translated the work of the Uruguayan poet Delmira Agustini (1886–1914), published as the collection A...

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