Derek Walcott

b. 1930
Derek WalcottPhoto: Chester Williams

Born on the island of Saint Lucia, a former British colony in the West Indies, poet and playwright Derek Walcott was trained as a painter but turned to writing as a young man. He published his first poem in the local newspaper at the age of 14. Five years later, he borrowed $200 to print his first collection, 25 Poems, which he distributed on street corners. Walcott’s major breakthrough came with the collection In a Green Night: Poems 1948-1960 (1962), a book which celebrates the Caribbean and its history as well as investigates the scars of colonialism and post-colonialism. Throughout a long and distinguished career, Walcott has returned to those same themes of language, power, and place. His recent collections include Tiepolo’s Hound (2000), The Prodigal (2004), Selected Poems (edited by Edward Baugh, 2007) and White Egrets (2010). In 1992, Walcott won the Nobel Prize in Literature. The Nobel committee depicted his work as “a poetic oeuvre of great luminosity, sustained by a historical vision, the outcome of a multicultural commitment.”

Since the 1950s Walcott has divided his time between Boston, New York, and Saint Lucia. His work resonates with Western canon and Island influences, sometimes even shifting between Caribbean patois and English, and often addressing his English and West Indian ancestry. According to Los Angeles Times Book Review contributor Arthur Vogelsang, “These continuing polarities shoot an electricity to each other which is questioning and beautiful and which helps form a vision altogether Caribbean and international, personal (him to you, you to him), independent, and essential for readers of contemporary literature on all the continents.” Known for his technical control, erudition, and large canvases, Walcott is, according to poet and critic Sean O’Brien “one of the handful of poets currently at work in English who are capable of making a convincing attempt to write an epic…His work is conceived on an oceanic scale and one of its fundamental concerns is to give an account of the simultaneous unity and division created by the ocean and by human dealings with it.”

Many critics point to Omeros (1990), an epic poem reimagining the Trojan War as a Caribbean fishermen’s fight, as Walcott’s major achievement. The book is “an effort to touch every aspect of Caribbean experience,” according to O’Brien who also described it as an ars poetica, concerned “with art itself—its meaning and importance and the nature of an artistic vocation.” In reviewing Walcott’s Selected Poems (2007), poet Glyn Maxwell ascribes Walcott’s power as a poet not so much to his themes as to his ear: “The verse is constantly trembling with a sense of the body in time, the self slung across metre, whether metre is steps, or nights, or breath, whether lines are days, or years, or tides.”

Walcott is also a renowned playwright. In 1971 he won an Obie Award for his play Dream on Monkey Mountain, which The New Yorker described as “a poem in dramatic form.” Walcott’s plays generally treat aspects of the West Indian experience, often dealing with the socio-political and epistemological implications of post-colonialism and drawing upon various forms such as the fable, allegory, folk and morality play. With his twin brother, he cofounded the Trinidad Theater Workshop in 1950; in 1981, while teaching at Boston University, he founded the Boston Playwrights’ Theatre.

In addition to his Nobel Prize, Walcott’s honors include a MacArthur Foundation “genius” award, a Royal Society of Literature Award, and, in 1988, the Queen’s Medal for Poetry. He is an honorary member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. He is Professor of Poetry at Essex University.

 

(Updated 2010)

Career

Poet and playwright. Teacher at St. Mary's College, Castries, St. Lucia, West Indies, 1947-50 and 1954, Grenada Boys' Secondary School, St. George's, Grenada, West Indies, 1953-54, and at Jamaica College, Kingston, 1955. Feature writer, 1960-62, and drama critic, 1963-68, for Trinidad Guardian (Port-of-Spain, Trinidad); feature writer for Public Opinion (Kingston), 1956-57. Cofounder of St. Lucia Arts Guild, 1950, and Basement Theatre, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad; founding director of Little Carib Theatre Workshop (later Trinidad Theatre Workshop), 1959-76; Boston University, assistant professor of creative writing, 1981, visiting professor, 1985, currently professor of English. Visiting professor at Columbia University, 1981, and Harvard University, 1982 and 1987. Also lecturer at Rutgers University and Yale University.

Bibliography

POETRY
  • 25 Poems, Guardian Commercial Printery (Port-of-Spain, Trinidad), 1948.
  • Epitaph for the Young: XII Cantos, Barbados Advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados), 1949.
  • Poems, Kingston City Printery (Kingston, Jamaica), 1953.
  • In a Green Night: Poems, J. Cape (London, England), 1962, published as In a Green Night: Poems, 1948-1960, J. Cape (London, England), 1969.
  • Selected Poems, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1964.
  • The Castaway, J. Cape (London, England), 1965.
  • The Gulf and Other Poems, J. Cape (London, England), 1969, published with selections from The Castaway as The Gulf: Poems, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1970.
  • Another Life (long poem), Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1973, 2nd edition published with introduction, chronology and selected bibliography by Robert D. Hammer, Three Continents Press (Washington, DC), 1982.
  • Sea Grapes, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1976.
  • Selected Verse, Heinemann (London, England), 1976.
  • The Star-Apple Kingdom, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1979.
  • The Fortunate Traveller, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1981.
  • Selected Poetry, selected, annotated, and introduced by Wayne Brown, Heinemann (London, England), 1981, revised edition, 1993.
  • The Caribbean Poetry of Derek Walcott and the Art of Romare Beardon, Limited Editions Club (New York, NY), 1983.
  • Midsummer, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1984.
  • Collected Poems, 1948-1984, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1986.
  • The Arkansas Testament, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1987.
  • Omeros, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1990.
  • Collected Poems, Faber (London, England), 1990.
  • Poems, 1965-1980, J. Cape (London, England), 1992.
  • Derek Walcott: Selected Poems, Longman (London, England), 1993.
  • The Bounty, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1997.
  • Tiepolo's Hound, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 2000.
  • The Prodigal (book-length poem), Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 2004.
  • Selected Poems, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 2007.
  • White Egrets, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 2010.
Contributor of poems to numerous periodicals, including New Statesman, London Magazine, Encounter, Evergreen Review, Caribbean Quarterly, Tamarack Review, and Bim.
PLAYS
  • Cry for a Leader, produced in St. Lucia, 1950.
  • Senza Alcum Sospetto (radio play), broadcast 1950, produced as Paolo and Francesca, in St. Lucia, 1951.
  • (And director) Henri Christophe: A Chronicle in Seven Scenes (first produced in Castries, West Indies, 1950; produced in London, England, 1952), Barbados Advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados), 1950.
  • Robin and Andrea, published in Bim (Christ Church, Barados), 1950.
  • Three Assassins, produced in St. Lucia, West Indies, 1951.
  • The Price of Mercy, produced in St. Lucia, West Indies, 1951.
  • (And director) Harry Dernier: A Play for Radio Production (produced in Mona, Jamaica, 1952; radio play broadcast as Dernier, 1952), Barbados Advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados), 1952.
  • (And director) The Wine of the Country (produced in Mona, Jamaica, 1956), University College of the West Indies (Mona, Jamaica), 1953.
  • The Sea at Dauphin: A Play in One Act (first produced in Mona, Jamaica, 1953; produced in Trinidad, 1954, London, England, 1960, New York, NY, 1978), Extra-Mural Department, University College of the West Indies (Mona, Jamaica), 1954, also included in Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays (also see below).
  • Crossroads, produced in Jamaica, 1954.
  • (And director) The Charlatan, Walcott directed first production in Mona, Jamaica, 1954; revised version with music by Fred Hope and Rupert Dennison produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1973; revised version with music by Galt MacDermot produced in Los Angeles, 1974; revised version produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1977.
  • Ione: A Play with Music (first produced in Kingston, 1957), Extra-Mural Department, University College of the West Indies (Mona, Jamaica), 1957.
  • Drums and Colours: An Epic Drama (first produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1958), published in Caribbean Quarterly, March-June, 1961.
  • (And director) Ti-Jean and His Brothers (first produced in Castries, St. Lucia, 1957; Walcott directed a revised version produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1958; produced in Hanover, NH, 1971; Walcott directed a production Off-Broadway at Delacorte Theatre, 1972; produced in London, 1986), included in Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays(also see below).
  • Malcauchon; or, The Six in the Rain (sometimes "Malcauchon" transliterated as "Malcochon"; one-act; first produced as Malcauchon in Castries, St. Lucia, 1959; produced as Six in the Rain, in London, England, 1960; produced Off-Broadway at St. Mark's Playhouse, 1969), Extra-Mural Department, University of West Indies (Port-of-Spain, Trinidad), 1966, also included in Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays (also see below).
  • Jourmard; or, A Comedy till the Last Minute, first produced in St. Lucia, 1959; produced in New York, NY, 1962.
  • (And director) Batai (carnival show), produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1965.
  • (And director) Dream on Monkey Mountain (first produced in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1967; produced in Waterford, CT, 1969; and Off-Broadway at St. Mark's Playhouse, 1970), included in Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays (also see below).
  • (And director) Franklin: A Tale of the Islands, first produced in Georgetown, Guyana, 1969; Walcott directed a revised version produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1973.
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays (contains Dream on Monkey Mountain, The Sea at Dauphin, Malcauchon; or, The Six in the Rain, Ti-Jean and His Brothers, and the essay "What the Twilight Says: An Overture"), Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1970.
  • (And director) In a Fine Castle, (Walcott directed first production in Mona, Jamaica, 1970; produced in Los Angeles, CA, 1972), excerpt as Conscience of a Revolution published in Express (Port-of-Spain, Trinidad), October 24, 1971.
  • The Joker of Seville (musical; music by Galt MacDermot; adaptation of the play by Tirso de Molina; first produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1974), included in The Joker of Seville and O Babylon!: Two Plays (also see below).
  • (And director) O Babylon! (music by Galt MacDermot; Walcott directed first production in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1976; produced in London, England, 1988), included in The Joker of Seville and O Babylon!: Two Plays (also see below).
  • (And director) Remembrance (three-act; Walcott directed first production in St. Croix, Virgin Islands, December, 1977; produced Off-Broadway at The Other Stage, 1979 ; and London, England, 1980), included in Remembrance & Pantomime: Two Plays (also see below).
  • The Snow Queen (television play), excerpt published in People(Port-of-Spain, Trinidad), April, 1977.
  • Pantomime (first produced in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 1978; produced London, England, 1979, Washington, DC, 1981, and Off-Broadway at the Hudson Guild Theater, 1986), included in Remembrance & Pantomime: Two Plays (also see below).
  • The Joker of Seville and O Babylon!: Two Plays, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1978.
  • (And director) Marie Laveau (music by Galt MacDermot; first produced in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, 1979), excerpts published in Trinidad and Tobago Review (Tunapuna), 1979.
  • Remembrance & Pantomime: Two Plays, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1980.
  • Beef, No Chicken (Walcott directed first production in New Haven, CT, 1982; produced in London, England, 1989), included in Three Plays (also see below).
  • The Isle Is Full of Noises, first produced at the John W. Huntington Theater, Hartford, CT, 1982.
  • Three Plays (contains The Last Carnival, Beef, No Chicken, and A Branch of the Blue Nile), Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1986.
  • Steel, first produced at the American Repertory Theatre, Cambridge, MA, 1991.
  • The Odyssey: A Stage Version, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1993.
  • (With Paul Simon) The Capeman: A Musical (produced on Broadway at the Marquis Theater, December, 1997), Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1998.
  • The Haitian Trilogy, Farrar, Straus and Giroux (New York, NY), 2002.
Also author of the play To Die for Grenada.
OTHER
  • Henri Christophe: A Chronicle in Seven Scenes, Barbados Advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados), 1950.
  • Another Life: Fully Annotated, Lynne Rienner Publishers (Boulder, CO), reprinted with a critical essay and comprehensive notes by Edward Baugh and Colbert Nepaulsingh, 2004.
  • The Poet in the Theatre, Poetry Book Society (London, England), 1990.
  • The Antilles: Fragments of Epic Memory: The Nobel Lecture, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1993.
  • Conversations with Derek Walcott, edited by William Baer, University of Mississippi (Jackson, MS), 1996.
  • (With Joseph Brodsky and Seamus Heaney) Homage to Robert Frost, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1996.
  • What the Twilight Says (essays), Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1998.
  • Walker and Ghost Dance, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 2002.
CONTRIBUTOR
  • John Figueroa, editor, Caribbean Voices, Evans (London, England), 1966.
  • Barbara Howes, editor, From the Green Antilles, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1966.
  • Howard Sergeant, editor, Commonwealth Poems of Today, Murray (London, England), 1967.
  • O. R. Dathorne, editor, Caribbean Verse, Heinemann (London, England), 1968.
  • Anne Walmsley, compiler, The Sun's Eye: West Indian Writing for Young Readers, Longmans, Green (London, England) 1968.
  • Orde Coombs, editor, Is Massa Day Dead?, Doubleday (New York, NY), 1974.
  • D. J. Enright, editor, Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, 1945-1980, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1980.
  • Errol Hill, editor, Plays for Today, Longman (London, England), 1985.
  • (Author of introduction) George Plimpton, editor, Latin American Writers at Work, Modern Library (New York, NY), 2003.
Also contributor to Caribbean Literature, edited by George Robert Coulthard; New Voices of the Commonwealth, edited by Howard Sergeant; and Young Commonwealth Poetry, edited by Peter Ludwig Brent. Some of Walcott's personal papers are housed at the University of the West Indies in Saint Augustine, Trinidad.

Further Reading

BOOKS

  • Baugh, Edward, Derek Walcott: Memory As Vision: Another Life, Longman (London, England), 1978.
  • Bloom, Harold, Derek Walcott, Chelsea House (New York, NY), 1988.
  • Brown, Stewart, editor, The Art of Derek Walcott, Dufour (Chester Springs, PA), 1991.
  • Contemporary Literary Criticism, Gale (Detroit, MI), Volume 2, 1974, Volume 4, 1975, Volume 9, 1978, Volume 14, 1980, Volume 25, 1983, Volume 42, 1987, Volume 67, 1992, Volume 76, 1993.
  • Contemporary Poets, 6th edition, St. James Press (Detroit, MI), 1996.
  • Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 117: Twentieth-Century Caribbean and Black African Writers, Gale (Detroit, MI), 1992.
  • Dictionary of Literary Biography Yearbook, Gale (Detroit, MI), 1981, 1982,, and 1992, 1993.
  • Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Culture, Volume 5: African-American Culture, Gale (Detroit, MI), 1996.
  • Goldstraw, Irma, Derek Walcott: An Annotated Bibliography of His Works, Garland Publishing (New York, NY), 1984.
  • Hamner, Robert D., compiler and editor, Critical Perspectives on Derek Walcott, Three Continents Press (Washington, DC), 1993.
  • Hamner, Robert D., Derek Walcott, Twayne (Boston, MA), 1981.
  • Hamner, Robert D., Epic of the Dispossessed: Derek Walcott's "Omeros," University of Missouri Press (Columbia, MO), 1997.
  • Harper, Michael S., and Robert B. Stepto, editors, Chant of Saints, University of Illinois Press (Urbana, IL), 1979.
  • Herdeck, Donald E., editor, Three Dynamite Authors: Derek Walcott (Nobel 1992), Naguib Mahfouz (Nobel 1988), Wole Soyinka (Nobel 1986): Ten Bio-critical Essays from Their Works As Published by Three Continents Press, Three Continents Press (Colorado Springs, CO), 1995.
  • King, Bruce Alvin, Derek Walcott and West Indian Drama: Not Only a Playwright but a Company, the Trinidad Theatre Workshop, 1959-1993, Oxford University (New York, NY), 1995.
  • Olaniyan, Tejumola, Scars of Conquest/Masks of Resistance: The Invention of Cultural Identities in African, African-American, and Caribbean Drama, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1995.
  • Parker, Michael, and Roger Starkey, editors, Postcolonial Literatures: Achebe, Ngugi, Desai, Walcott, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1995.
  • Rodman, Selden, Tongues of Fallen Angels, New Directions (New York, NY), 1974.
  • Schomburg Center Guide to Black Literature, Gale (Detroit, MI), 1996.
  • Terada, Rei, Derek Walcott's Poetry: American Mimicry, Northeastern University Press (Boston, MA), 1992.
  • Thomas, Ned, Derek Walcott, Poet of the Islands, Welsh Arts Council (Cardiff, Wales), 1980.
  • Walcott, Derek, In a Green Night: Poems, 1948-1960, J. Cape (London, England), 1962.
  • Walcott, Derek, Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1970.
  • Walcott, Derek, The Star-Apple Kingdom, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1979.
  • Walcott, Derek, Collected Poems, 1948-1984, Farrar, Straus (New York, NY), 1986.
  • Wheatcroft, John, editor, Our Other Voices: Nine Poets Speaking, Bucknell University Press (Lewisberg, VA) , 1991.
  • Wieland, James, The Ensphering Mind: History, Myth, and Fictions in the Poetry of Allen Curnow, Nissim Ezekiel, A. D. Hope, A. M. Klein, Christopher Okigbo, and Derek Walcott, Three Continents Press (Washington, DC), 1988.

PERIODICALS

  • African American Review, winter, 1999, "Conversations with Derek Walcott," p. 708.
  • American Poetry Review, May-June, 1978.
  • American Theatre, May-June, 1993, Patti Hartigan, "The Passions of Derek Walcott," p. 14.
  • Architectural Digest, January, 1997.
  • Art Journal, spring, 2001, review of Tiepolo's Hound, p. 107.
  • Atlanta Journal and Constitution, April 23, 1995.
  • Black Issues Book Review, May, 2001, Gregory A. Pardlo, review of Tiepolo's Hound, p. 34.
  • Booklist, April 15, 1997; December 1, 2001, Jack Helbig, review of The Haitian Trilogy, p. 625; August, 2002, Jack Helbig, review of Walker and Ghost Dance, p. 1912.
  • Books and Bookmen, April, 1972.
  • Book World, December 13, 1970; January 3, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. 13.
  • Boston Globe, January 20, 1996; October 16, 1996; October 12, 1997; November 16, 1997.
  • Callaloo, spring, 1999, review of Omeros, p. 509; winter, 2001, review of Omeros, p. 276.
  • Caribbean Writer, Volume 13, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. 234.
  • Chicago Tribune Book World, May 2, 1982; September 9, 1984; March 9, 1986.
  • Choice, March, 1995.
  • Christian Science Monitor, March 19, 1982; April 6, 1984.
  • Chronicle of Higher Education, April 19, 1996, p. A23.
  • Classical World, September, 1999, reviews of Omeros, p. 7, and The Odyssey: A Stage Version, p. 71.
  • Commonweal, April 10, 1998, review of Capeman.
  • Contemporary Literature, summer, 1979; winter, 1994, Graham Huggan, "A Tale of Two Parrots: Walcott, Rhys, and the Uses of Colonial Mimicry," p. 643.
  • Detroit Free Press, October 9, 1992.
  • Economist, September 6, 1997, review of The Bounty.
  • English Journal, March, 1994, p. 94.
  • Entertainment Weekly, February 13, 1998.
  • Georgia Review, summer, 1984.
  • Hudson Review, summer, 1984.
  • Interview, December, 1997, author interview.
  • Journal of Commonwealth Literature, December, 1976; August, 1981; August, 1986.
  • Library Journal, November 1, 1994, p. 127; June 1, 1996; April 15, 1997, review of The Bounty; October 15, 1998; May 15, 2000, Graham Christian, review of Tiepolo's Hound, p. 98; November 1, 2001, review of The Haitian Trilogy, p. 117; January, 2002, Thomas E. Luddy, review of The Haitian Trilogy, p. 105; July, 2002, Thomas E. Luddy, review of Walker and the Ghost Dance, p. 81.
  • Literary Review, spring, 1986.
  • London Magazine, December, 1973-January, 1974; February-March, 1977.
  • Los Angeles Times, November 12, 1986.
  • Los Angeles Times Book Review, April 4, 1982; May 21, 1985; April 6, 1986; October 26, 1986; September 6, 1987; January 20, 1991; October 20, 1996.
  • Nation, February 12, 1977; May 19, 1979; February 27, 1982.
  • National Review, November 3, 1970; June 20, 1986, James W. Tuttleton, review of Collected Poems: 1948-1984, p. 51.
  • New Criterion, March, 1998, Mark Steyn, review of Capeman, p. 38.
  • New Leader, March 11, 1991, Phoebde Pettingell, review of Omeros, p. 15; January 13, 1997, review of Homage to Robert Frost; September 8, 1997, review of The Bounty.
  • New Republic, November 20, 1976; March 17, 1982; January 23, 1984; March 24, 1986, J. D. McClatchy, review of Collected Poems, p. 36; October 29, 1990, Christopher Benfey, review of Omeros, p. 36; December 28, 1992; December 15, 1997, review of The Bounty; March 30, 1998, review of Capeman.
  • New Statesman, March 19, 1982; August 15, 1997, review of The Bounty.
  • New Statesman & Society, October, 16, 1992; July 21, 1995.
  • Newsweek, October 19, 1992.
  • New York, August 14, 1972; February 16, 1998.
  • New Yorker, March 27, 1971; June 26, 1971; December 12, 1992; February 9, 1998.
  • New York Review of Books, December 31, 1964; May 6, 1971; June 13, 1974; October 14, 1976; May 31, 1979; March 4, 1982; November 10, 1983; March 27, 1997.
  • New York Times, March 21, 1979; August 21, 1979; May 30, 1981; May 2, 1982; January 15, 1986; December 17, 1986; October 9, 1992; June 1, 1995; November 13, 1997.
  • New York Times Book Review, September 13, 1964; October 11, 1970; May 6, 1973; October 31, 1976; May 13, 1979; January 3, 1982; April 8, 1984; February 2, 1986; December 20, 1987; October 7, 1990; October 6, 1996; June 29, 1997.
  • New York Times Magazine, May 23, 1982; November 9, 1997.
  • Observer (London, England), October 11, 1992; February 14, 1999.
  • Paris Review, winter, 1986.
  • Poetry, February, 1972; December, 1973; July, 1977; December, 1984; June, 1986; August, 1998; August, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. 286; April, 2001, Paul Breslin, review of Tiepolo's Hound, p. 38.
  • Progressive, June, 1998, review of Capeman.
  • Publishers Weekly, July 15, 1996, review of Homage to Robert Frost; May 26, 1997, review of The Bounty; August 31, 1998; February 7, 2000, review ofTiepolo's Hound, p. 69.
  • Research in African Literature, summer, 1994, Patrick Hogan, review of Dream on Monkey Mountain, p. 103; spring, 2003, Edward Baugh, "Derek Walcott and the Centering of the Caribbean Subject," p. 151.
  • Review, winter, 1974.
  • Sewanee Review, January, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. R25.
  • South Carolina Review, fall, 1999, review of Omeros, p. 142.
  • Spectator (London, England), May 10, 1980.
  • Third World Quarterly, October, 1988.
  • Time, March 15, 1982; October 11, 1992; October 31, 1994, p. 78; July 14, 1997, Pico Iyer, review of The Bounty, p. 85; January 19, 1998; April 3, 2000, Paul Gray, "Islands in the Stream: Poet Derek Walcott Spins a Luminous Meditation on Visual Art," p. 81.
  • Times Literary Supplement, December 25, 1969; August 3, 1973; July 23, 1976; August 8, 1980; September 8, 1980; September 24, 1982; November 9, 1984; October 24, 1986; October 1, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. 25.
  • Tribune Books (Chicago, IL), November 8, 1987.
  • TriQuarterly, winter, 1986.
  • Twentieth-Century Literature, summer, 2001, Charles W. Pollard, "Traveling with Joyce: Derek Walcott's Discrepant Cosmopolitan Modernism," p. 197; fall, 2001, Robert D. Hamner, review of The Odyssey: A Stage Version, p. 374.
  • Village Voice, April 11, 1974.
  • Virginia Quarterly Review, winter, 1974; summer, 1984; summer, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. 84.
  • Vogue, January, 1998.
  • Wall Street Journal, October 9, 1992.
  • Washington Post Book World, February 21, 1982; April 13, 1986; November 11, 1990; April 26, 1995.
  • Western Humanities Review, spring, 1977.
  • World Literature Today, spring, 1977; summer, 1979; summer, 1981; winter, 1985; summer, 1986; winter, 1987; winter, 1989; winter, 1997; winter, 1998, review of The Bounty, p. 191; spring, 1999, review of What the Twilight Says, p. 339; autumn, 2000, Jim Hannan, review of Tiepolo's Hound, p. 797.
  • World Literature Written in English, April, 1973; April, 1977; November, 1977; spring, 1986; spring, 1987.
  • Yale Review, October, 1973.
  • Yomiuri Shimbun/Daily Yomiuri, August 22, 2000, "Walcott Turns an Artistic Eye to Colonialism in Epic Poem," p. YOSH12474972.

ONLINE

  • Academy of American Poets Web site, http://www.poets.org/ (June 3, 2003), author biography.
  • Boston University Web site, http://www.bu.edu/ (June 3, 2003), Derek Walcott faculty profile.
  • Nobel e-Museum Web site, http://www.nobel.se/ (June 3, 2003), author biographical material and interview.
  • Richmond Review Online, http://www.richmondreview.co.uk/ (June 3, 2003), Amanda Jeremin Harris, review of Tiepolo's Hound.

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POET’S REGION Caribbean

LIFE SPAN 1930–

Derek Walcott

Biography

Born on the island of Saint Lucia, a former British colony in the West Indies, poet and playwright Derek Walcott was trained as a painter but turned to writing as a young man. He published his first poem in the local newspaper at the age of 14. Five years later, he borrowed $200 to print his first collection, 25 Poems, which he distributed on street corners. Walcott’s major breakthrough came with the collection In a Green Night: . . .

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