Katha Pollitt

b. 1949
Katha Pollitt
Born in New York City, poet, political columnist, and personal essayist Katha Pollitt was educated at Radcliffe and earned an MFA from Columbia University. She is the author of the poetry collections The Mind-Body Problem (2009) and Antarctic Traveller (1981), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her poems have been featured in several anthologies, including The Oxford Book of American Poetry (2006) and Best American Poetry 2011.
 
Pollitt’s columns for The Nation, the New York Times, and the New Yorker are compiled in Reasonable Creatures: Essays on Women and Feminism (1995), which was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Subject to Debate: Sense and Dissents on Women, Politics, and Culture (2001); and Virginity or Death! And Other Social and Political Issues of Our Time (2006). The title piece of her personal essay collection Learning to Drive: And Other Life Stories (2007) was anthologized in Best American Essays (2003).
 
A Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, Pollitt has also received a Whiting Foundation Writing Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. She has taught poetry at Princeton University, Barnard College, and the 92nd Street Y. She lives in Berlin, Germany.

Articles By KATHA POLLITT

Poet Categorization

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

LIFE SPAN 1949–

Katha Pollitt

Biography

Born in New York City, poet, political columnist, and personal essayist Katha Pollitt was educated at Radcliffe and earned an MFA from Columbia University. She is the author of the poetry collections The Mind-Body Problem (2009) and Antarctic Traveller (1981), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her poems have been featured in several anthologies, including The Oxford Book of American Poetry (2006) and Best . . .

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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