Jabberwocky

By Lewis Carroll 1832–1898 Lewis Carroll
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
      The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
      The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand;
      Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree
      And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
      The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
      And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
      The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
      He went galumphing back.

“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
      Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
      He chortled in his joy.

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
      Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
      And the mome raths outgrabe.

Source: The Random House Book of Poetry for Children (1983)

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Poet Lewis Carroll 1832–1898

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Arts & Sciences, Mythology & Folklore, Humor & Satire

Poetic Terms Ballad

 Lewis  Carroll

Biography

Self-effacing, yet having an expressive critical ability; reveling in the possibilities of fancy, though thoroughly at home with the sophisticated nuances of logic and mathematics, Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was an individual who, through his rare and diversified literary gifts and power of communication, would leave an indelible mark upon the imaginations of children and accessible adults both during his . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Arts & Sciences, Mythology & Folklore, Humor & Satire

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Ballad

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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