The Owl and the Pussy-Cat

By Edward Lear 1812–1888 Edward Lear
I
The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea
   In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
   Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
   And sang to a small guitar,
"O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
    What a beautiful Pussy you are,
         You are,
         You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!"

II
Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl!
   How charmingly sweet you sing!
O let us be married! too long we have tarried:
   But what shall we do for a ring?"
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
   To the land where the Bong-Tree grows
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood
   With a ring at the end of his nose,
             His nose,
             His nose,
   With a ring at the end of his nose.

III
"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
   Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will."
So they took it away, and were married next day
   By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
   Which they ate with a runcible spoon;   
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
   They danced by the light of the moon,
             The moon,
             The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.

Source: The Random House Book of Poetry for Children (1983)

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Poet Edward Lear 1812–1888

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Animals, Relationships, Nature, Marriage & Companionship, Love, Living, Pets, Romantic Love, Classic Love

Occasions Engagement, Weddings

Holidays Valentine's Day

Poetic Terms Ballad

 Edward  Lear

Biography

Vivien Noakes fittingly subtitled her biography of Edward Lear The Life of a Wanderer. On a literal level the phrase refers to Lear's constant traveling as a self-proclaimed "dirty landscape painter" from 1837 until he finally settled at his Villa Tennyson on the San Remo coast of Italy in 1880. But wandering, in that it suggests rootlessness, aimlessness, loneliness, and uncertainty, is also a metaphor for Lear's emotional life . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Animals, Relationships, Nature, Marriage & Companionship, Love, Living, Pets, Romantic Love, Classic Love

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Ballad

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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