Worldly Place

By Matthew Arnold 1822–1888 Matthew Arnold
Even in a palace, life may be led well!
So spake the imperial sage, purest of men,
Marcus Aurelius. But the stifling den
Of common life, where, crowded up pell-mell,

Our freedom for a little bread we sell,
And drudge under some foolish master's ken
Who rates us if we peer outside our pen—
Match'd with a palace, is not this a hell?

Even in a palace! On his truth sincere,
Who spoke these words, no shadow ever came;
And when my ill-school'd spirit is aflame

Some nobler, ampler stage of life to win,
I'll stop, and say: "There were no succour here!
The aids to noble life are all within."

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Poet Matthew Arnold 1822–1888



Subjects Arts & Sciences, Social Commentaries, History & Politics, Class, Philosophy

Occasions Farewells & Good Luck, Graduation, Toasts & Celebrations

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 Matthew  Arnold


Among the major Victorian writers sharing in a revival of interest and respect in the second half of the twentieth century, Matthew Arnold is unique in that his reputation rests equally upon his poetry and his prose. Only a quarter of his productive life was given to writing poetry, but many of the same values, attitudes, and feelings that are expressed in his poems achieve a fuller or more balanced formulation in his prose. . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Arts & Sciences, Social Commentaries, History & Politics, Class, Philosophy



Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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