The Divine Image

By William Blake 1757–1827 William Blake
To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
All pray in their distress;
And to these virtues of delight
Return their thankfulness.

For Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is God, our father dear,
And Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is Man, his child and care.

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

Then every man, of every clime,
That prays in his distress,
Prays to the human form divine,
Love, Mercy, Pity, Peace.

And all must love the human form,
In heathen, Turk, or Jew;
Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
There God is dwelling too.

Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet William Blake 1757–1827

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects God & the Divine, Philosophy, Arts & Sciences, Religion

Poetic Terms Allusion, Refrain

 William  Blake

Biography

In his Life of William Blake (1863) Alexander Gilchrist warned his readers that Blake "neither wrote nor drew for the many, hardly for work'y-day men at all, rather for children and angels; himself 'a divine child,' whose playthings were sun, moon, and stars, the heavens and the earth." Yet Blake himself believed that his writings were of national importance and that they could be understood by a majority of men. Far from being . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT God & the Divine, Philosophy, Arts & Sciences, Religion

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Poetic Terms Allusion, Refrain

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.