Song: How sweet I roam'd from field to field

By William Blake 1757–1827 William Blake
How sweet I roam'd from field to field,
         And tasted all the summer's pride,
'Till I the prince of love beheld,
         Who in the sunny beams did glide!

He shew'd me lilies for my hair,
         And blushing roses for my brow;
He led me through his gardens fair,
         Where all his golden pleasures grow.

With sweet May dews my wings were wet,
         And Phoebus fir'd my vocal rage;
He caught me in his silken net,
         And shut me in his golden cage.

He loves to sit and hear me sing,
         Then, laughing, sports and plays with me;
Then stretches out my golden wing,
         And mocks my loss of liberty.

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Poet William Blake 1757–1827

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Mythology & Folklore, Animals, Sorrow & Grieving, Trees & Flowers, Relationships, Nature, Heroes & Patriotism, Summer, Living, Pets

Poetic Terms Allusion, Rhymed Stanza

 William  Blake

Biography

In his Life of William Blake (1863) Alexander Gilchrist warned his readers that Blake "neither wrote nor drew for the many, hardly for work'y-day men at all, rather for children and angels; himself 'a divine child,' whose playthings were sun, moon, and stars, the heavens and the earth." Yet Blake himself believed that his writings were of national importance and that they could be understood by a majority of men. Far from being . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Mythology & Folklore, Animals, Sorrow & Grieving, Trees & Flowers, Relationships, Nature, Heroes & Patriotism, Summer, Living, Pets

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Poetic Terms Allusion, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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