Evening

By William Lisle Bowles 1762–1850 William Lisle Bowles
Evening! as slow thy placid shades descend,
      Veiling with gentlest hush the landscape still,
      The lonely battlement, the farthest hill
And wood, I think of those who have no friend;
Who now, perhaps, by melancholy led,
      From the broad blaze of day, where pleasure flaunts,
      Retiring, wander to the ring-dove’s haunts
Unseen; and watch the tints that o’er thy bed
Hang lovely; oft to musing Fancy’s eye
      Presenting fairy vales, where the tir’d mind
      Might rest beyond the murmurs of mankind,
Nor hear the hourly moans of misery!
Alas for man! that Hope’s fair views the while
Should smile like you, and perish as they smile!

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Poet William Lisle Bowles 1762–1850

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 William Lisle  Bowles

Biography

Thomas Moore—William Lisle Bowles's friend, fellow minor poet, and longtime Wiltshire neighbor—recorded in a journal for 20 March 1819 that he found the middle-aged vicar "in the bar of the White Hart, dictating to a waiter (who acted as an amanuensis for him) his ideas of the true Sublime in Poetry." He concluded by recalling the innocent, absentminded, and benevolent country parson in Henry Fielding's Joseph Andrews (1742): . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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