On the Death of Anne Brontë

By Charlotte Brontë 1816–1855 Charlotte Bronte
THERE 's little joy in life for me,
      And little terror in the grave;
I 've lived the parting hour to see
      Of one I would have died to save.

Calmly to watch the failing breath,
      Wishing each sigh might be the last;
Longing to see the shade of death
      O'er those belovèd features cast.

The cloud, the stillness that must part
      The darling of my life from me;
And then to thank God from my heart,
      To thank Him well and fervently;

Although I knew that we had lost
      The hope and glory of our life;
And now, benighted, tempest-tossed,
      Must bear alone the weary strife.

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Poet Charlotte Brontë 1816–1855

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Family & Ancestors, Religion, Relationships, Living, Death, God & the Divine

Occasions Funerals

Poetic Terms Elegy

 Charlotte  Brontë

Biography

Although Charlotte Brontë is one of the most famous Victorian women writers, only two of her poems are widely read today, and these are not her best or most interesting poems. Like her contemporary Elizabeth Barrett Browning, she experimented with the poetic forms that became the characteristic modes of the Victorian period—the long narrative poem and the dramatic monologue—but unlike Browning, Brontë gave up writing poetry at . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Family & Ancestors, Religion, Relationships, Living, Death, God & the Divine

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Elegy

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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