So We'll Go No More a Roving

By Lord Byron (George Gordon) 1788–1824 Lord Byron (George Gordon)
So, we'll go no more a roving
   So late into the night,
Though the heart be still as loving,
   And the moon be still as bright.

For the sword outwears its sheath,
   And the soul wears out the breast,
And the heart must pause to breathe,
   And love itself have rest.

Though the night was made for loving,
   And the day returns too soon,
Yet we'll go no more a roving
   By the light of the moon.

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Poet Lord Byron (George Gordon) 1788–1824

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Subjects Relationships, Time & Brevity, Travels & Journeys, Activities, Separation & Divorce, Love, Disappointment & Failure, Living, Sorrow & Grieving, Romantic Love, Realistic & Complicated

Occasions Farewells & Good Luck

Poetic Terms Common Measure, Ballad

 Lord  Byron (George Gordon)

Biography

The most flamboyant and notorious of the major Romantics, George Gordon, Lord Byron, was likewise the most fashionable poet of the day. He created an immensely popular Romantic hero—defiant, melancholy, haunted by secret guilt—for which, to many, he seemed the model. He is also a Romantic paradox: a leader of the era’s poetic revolution, he named Alexander Pope as his master; a worshiper of the ideal, he never lost touch with . . .

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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