Disdain Returned

By Thomas Carew 1595–1640 Thomas Carew
He that loves a rosy cheek,
         Or a coral lip admires,
Or from star-like eyes doth seek
         Fuel to maintain his fires;
As old Time makes these decay,
So his flames must waste away.

But a smooth and steadfast mind,
         Gentle thoughts and calm desires,
Hearts with equal love combin'd,
         Kindle never-dying fires.
Where these are not, I despise
Lovely cheeks, or lips, or eyes.

No tears, Celia, now shall win
         My resolv'd heart to return;
I have search'd thy soul within,
         And find nought, but pride, and scorn;
I have learn'd thy arts, and now
Can disdain as much as thou.
Some power, in my revenge, convey
That love to her I cast away.

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Poet Thomas Carew 1595–1640

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Relationships, Desire, Break-ups & Vexed Love

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Thomas  Carew

Biography

Thomas Carew was the poetic arbiter elegantiae of the court of Charles I. He gave one last witty spin to the tradition of Petrarchan lyric, polishing and resetting the traditional conceits of love poetry for an increasingly sophisticated and aristocratic audience. Carew penned the most notorious erotic poem of the seventeenth century, "A Rapture," as well as what is generally regarded as the most accomplished of the Caroline . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Relationships, Desire, Break-ups & Vexed Love

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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