The Parlement of Fowls

By Geoffrey Chaucer 1340–1400 Geoffrey Chaucer

(excerpt)

Now welcome, somer, with thy sonne softe,
That hast this wintres wedres overshake,
And driven away the longe nyghtes blake!

   Saynt Valentyn, that art ful hy on-lofte,
Thus syngen smale foules for thy sake:
         Now welcome, somer, with thy sonne softe,
         That hast this wintres wedres overshake.

   Wel han they cause for to gladen ofte,
Sith ech of hem recovered hath hys make;
Ful blissful mowe they synge when they wake:
         Now welcome, somer, with thy sonne softe
         That hast this wintres wedres overshake
         And driven away the longe nyghtes blake!

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Poet Geoffrey Chaucer 1340–1400

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Middle English

Subjects Relationships, Spring, Nature, Winter, Love, Romantic Love

Holidays Valentine's Day

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

Biography

Author of the immortal Canterbury Tales, GEOFFREY CHAUCER (ca. 1340—1400) is the undisputed father of English poetry. His pitch-perfect, melodic versification demonstrated the riches of the evolving language’s resources, while his memorable portraits of many human types glow with warmth and humor. A man of affairs as well as literature, he served as a diplomat and customs officer; when he died, his burial in Westminster . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Relationships, Spring, Nature, Winter, Love, Romantic Love

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Middle English

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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