Idea 61: “Since there’s no help, come let us kiss and part”

By Michael Drayton 1563–1631 Michael Drayton
Since there’s no help, come let us kiss and part.
Nay, I have done, you get no more of me;
And I am glad, yea glad with all my heart,
That thus so cleanly I myself can free.
Shake hands for ever, cancel all our vows,
And when we meet at any time again,
Be it not seen in either of our brows
That we one jot of former love retain.
Now at the last gasp of Love’s latest breath,
When, his pulse failing, Passion speechless lies;
When Faith is kneeling by his bed of death,
And Innocence is closing up his eyes—
Now, if thou wouldst, when all have given him over,
From death to life thou might’st him yet recover!

Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet Michael Drayton 1563–1631

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Subjects Separation & Divorce, Love, Living, Relationships, Classic Love, Break-ups & Vexed Love, Realistic & Complicated

Occasions Farewells & Good Luck

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 Michael  Drayton

Biography

In late-seventeenth-century estimates of literary stature, Michael Drayton ranks only slightly below Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Ben Jonson. Until the middle of the twentieth century, Drayton's position as an important minor poet seemed secure, but his lengthy historical poems did not lend themselves to the techniques of close reading popularized during the vogue of New Criticism in the 1940s and after. An . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Separation & Divorce, Love, Living, Relationships, Classic Love, Break-ups & Vexed Love, Realistic & Complicated

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD 17th Century

Poetic Terms Sonnet

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.