Fair Iris I Love and Hourly I Die

By John Dryden 1631–1700 John Dryden
Fair Iris I love and hourly I die,
But not for a lip nor a languishing eye:
She's fickle and false, and there I agree;
For I am as false and as fickle as she:
We neither believe what either can say;
And, neither believing, we neither betray.

'Tis civil to swear and say things, of course;
We mean not the taking for better or worse.
When present we love, when absent agree;
I think not of Iris, nor Iris of me:
The legend of love no couple can find
So easy to part, or so equally join'd.

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Poet John Dryden 1631–1700

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Relationships, Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Men & Women, Realistic & Complicated

Poetic Terms Couplet, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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