Song: “You charm'd me not with that fair face”

By John Dryden 1631–1700 John Dryden

from An Evening's Love

You charm'd me not with that fair face
      Though it was all divine:
To be another's is the grace,
      That makes me wish you mine.

   The Gods and Fortune take their part
      Who like young monarchs fight;
And boldly dare invade that heart
      Which is another's right.

   First mad with hope we undertake
      To pull up every bar;
But once possess'd, we faintly make
      A dull defensive war.

   Now every friend is turn'd a foe
      In hope to get our store:
And passion makes us cowards grow,
      Which made us brave before.

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Poet John Dryden 1631–1700

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Friends & Enemies, Relationships, Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Romantic Love, Classic Love, Unrequited Love

Poetic Terms Common Measure

 John  Dryden

Biography

After John Donne and John Milton, John Dryden was the greatest English poet of the seventeenth century. After William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, he was the greatest playwright. And he has no peer as a writer of prose, especially literary criticism, and as a translator. Other figures, such as George Herbert or Andrew Marvell or William Wycherley or William Congreve, may figure more prominently in anthologies and literary . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Friends & Enemies, Relationships, Living, Disappointment & Failure, Love, Romantic Love, Classic Love, Unrequited Love

POET’S REGION England

Poetic Terms Common Measure

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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