For Once, Then, Something

By Robert Frost 1874–1963 Robert Frost

Others taunt me with having knelt at well-curbs
Always wrong to the light, so never seeing
Deeper down in the well than where the water
Gives me back in a shining surface picture
Me myself in the summer heaven godlike
Looking out of a wreath of fern and cloud puffs.
Once, when trying with chin against a well-curb,
I discerned, as I thought, beyond the picture,
Through the picture, a something white, uncertain,
Something more of the depths—and then I lost it.
Water came to rebuke the too clear water.
One drop fell from a fern, and lo, a ripple
Shook whatever it was lay there at bottom,
Blurred it, blotted it out. What was that whiteness?
Truth? A pebble of quartz? For once, then, something.

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Poet Robert Frost 1874–1963

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Religion, Living, Disappointment & Failure, Summer, Nature, Arts & Sciences, Philosophy

 Robert  Frost

Biography

Robert Frost holds a unique and almost isolated position in American letters. “Though his career fully spans the modern period and though it is impossible to speak of him as anything other than a modern poet,” writes James M. Cox, “it is difficult to place him in the main tradition of modern poetry.” In a sense, Frost stands at the crossroads of 19th-century American poetry and modernism, for in his verse may be found the . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Religion, Living, Disappointment & Failure, Summer, Nature, Arts & Sciences, Philosophy

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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