The Oven Bird

By Robert Frost 1874–1963 Robert Frost

There is a singer everyone has heard,
Loud, a mid-summer and a mid-wood bird,
Who makes the solid tree trunks sound again.
He says that leaves are old and that for flowers
Mid-summer is to spring as one to ten.
He says the early petal-fall is past
When pear and cherry bloom went down in showers
On sunny days a moment overcast;
And comes that other fall we name the fall.
He says the highway dust is over all.
The bird would cease and be as other birds
But that he knows in singing not to sing.
The question that he frames in all but words
Is what to make of a diminished thing.

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Poet Robert Frost 1874–1963

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Midlife, Spring, Living, Summer, Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature, Time & Brevity, Trees & Flowers, Animals

Poetic Terms Sonnet

 Robert  Frost

Biography

Robert Frost holds a unique and almost isolated position in American letters. "Though his career fully spans the modern period and though it is impossible to speak of him as anything other than a modern poet," writes James M. Cox, "it is difficult to place him in the main tradition of modern poetry." In a sense, Frost stands at the crossroads of nineteenth-century American poetry and modernism, for in his verse may be found the . . .

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SUBJECT Midlife, Spring, Living, Summer, Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature, Time & Brevity, Trees & Flowers, Animals

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Poetic Terms Sonnet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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