The Pasture

By Robert Frost 1874–1963 Robert Frost
I'm going out to clean the pasture spring;
I'll only stop to rake the leaves away
(And wait to watch the water clear, I may):
I sha'n't be gone long.—You come too.

I'm going out to fetch the little calf
That's standing by the mother. It's so young,
It totters when she licks it with her tongue.
I sha'n't be gone long.—You come too.

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Poet Robert Frost 1874–1963

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Subjects Activities, Jobs & Working, Pets, Relationships, Nature

Poetic Terms Refrain

 Robert  Frost

Biography

Robert Frost holds a unique and almost isolated position in American letters. "Though his career fully spans the modern period and though it is impossible to speak of him as anything other than a modern poet," writes James M. Cox, "it is difficult to place him in the main tradition of modern poetry." In a sense, Frost stands at the crossroads of nineteenth-century American poetry and modernism, for in his verse may be found the . . .

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SUBJECT Activities, Jobs & Working, Pets, Relationships, Nature

POET’S REGION U.S., New England

Poetic Terms Refrain

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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