In Tenebris

By Thomas Hardy 1840–1928 Thomas Hardy

“Percussus sum sicut foenum, et aruit cor meum.” —Ps. ci.

            Wintertime nighs;
But my bereavement-pain
It cannot bring again:
            Twice no one dies.

            Flower-petals flee;
But, since it once hath been,
No more that severing scene
            Can harrow me.

            Birds faint in dread:
I shall not lose old strength
In the lone frost's black length:
            Strength long since fled!

            Leaves freeze to dun;
But friends can not turn cold
This season as of old
            For him with none.

            Tempests may scath;
But love can not make smart
Again this year his heart
            Who no heart hath.

            Black is night's cope;
But death will not appal
One who, past doubtings all,
            Waits in unhope.

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Poet Thomas Hardy 1840–1928

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Living, Disappointment & Failure, Nature, Relationships, Arts & Sciences, Death

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

 Thomas  Hardy

Biography

One of the most renowned poets and novelists in English literary history, Thomas Hardy was born in 1840 in the English village of Higher Bockhampton in the county of Dorset. He died in 1928 at Max Gate, a house he built for himself and his first wife, Emma Lavinia Gifford, in Dorchester, a few miles from his birthplace. Hardy’s youth was influenced by the musicality of his father, a stonemason and fiddler, and his mother, Jemima . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure, Nature, Relationships, Arts & Sciences, Death

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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