Lusty Youth Should Us Ensue

By Henry VIII, king of England Henry VIII, king of England
Lusty Youth should us ensue,
His merry heart shall sure all rue.
For whatsoever they do him tell,
It is not for him, we know it well.

For they would have him his Liberty refrain
And all merry company for to disdain,
But I will not so whatsoever they say,
But follow his mind in all that we may.

How should Youth himself best use
But all disdainers for to refuse?
Youth has, as chief assurance,
Honest Mirth with Virtue's pastance.

For in them consisteth great honour,
Though that disdainers would therein put error,
For they do sue to get them grace
All only riches to purchase.

With Good Order, Counsel, and Equity,
Good Lord, grant us our mansion to be!
For without their good guidance
Youth should fall in great mischance.

For Youth is frail and prompt to do,
As well vices as virtues to ensue.
Wherefore by these he must be guided
And Virtue's pastance must be therein used.

Now unto God this prayer we make,
That this rude play may well be take,
And that we may our faults amend,
An bliss obtain at our last end.

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Poet Henry VIII, king of England

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Renaissance

Subjects Midlife, Living, School & Learning, Youth, Activities, Growing Old, Coming of Age

Poetic Terms Couplet

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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